2020 COLE FOUNDATION MENTORSHIP FOR EMERGING TRANSLATORS

The translation of new work for the stage is a core part of Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal’s (PWM) programming. Since its inception in 2013, the Cole Foundation Mentorship for Emerging Translators (formerly Cole Competition for Emerging Translators) has been guiding the next generation of translators from French into English. 

With the expert guidance of acclaimed translator Maureen Labonté and in partnership with the Cole Foundation, PWM has built a program that mentors emerging translators through every stage of the process. The successful applicant to this year’s mentorship program will receive a $1,000 honorarium and an eight-month mentorship with Maureen Labonté which includes a workshop with actors and a public reading.

WHO CAN APPLY?

To be eligible, emerging translators must have completed at least one translation which has received a public reading, publication or production. Because the focus is on developing translators, the applicant must not have done more than three translations. 

WITH WHAT PLAY(S)?

Before applying for the Mentorship, emerging translators must choose the play they wish to translate and contact the playwright for permission: Establishing a connection to the play and the playwright in advance means that the applicant is already invested in the proposed work and would be in a position to begin work immediately following the announcement of the selected project.

Translations must be from French into English only. 

Full-length scripts, one acts or theatre for young people are all welcome. Please note, our expertise does not extend to the translation of musicals.

SUPPORT PROVIDED

The recipient of the program will receive $1000 honorarium, dramaturgical support from renowned translator, Maureen Labonté, and a translation workshop with actors.

APPLICATION PROCESS

To apply, please send us:

  • A one-page letter of intent describing the project, its challenges and your reasons for wanting to translate the work;
  • Your biography (maximum 250 words);
  • A copy of your chosen play;
  • Written permission from the original playwright of the play;
  • A 3 to 5 page sample of your previous translation work, please include the corresponding original text.

Send all the documents in one email to emma@playwrights.ca with the subject line “2020 Cole Foundation Mentorship for Emerging Translators – Application”. 

The deadline to submit applications is October 11, 2020 at 11:59PM. All applicants will be notified of the results.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

If you have any questions about the eligibility of your application or your project, do not hesitate to contact us. Please address questions to Emma Tibaldo, Executive and Artistic Director of Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal, at emma@playwrights.ca.

In partnership with

Logo of the Cole Foundation

Our COVID-19 safety procedures

Our office and creative space are reopening! WE DEVELOPED EXTENSIVE POLICIES TO KEEP OUR SPACE AS SAFE AS POSSIBLE and To protect our staff, artists, and visitors. Read on to know exactly how we are welcoming you back.

This policy is for staff and contractors working for PWM on a regular basis.

Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal (PWM) validates with the staff member their state of health and that they have none of the following symptoms. Staff members will fill out a form OR sign-in sheet verifying this information, before each workday. This is done digitally or on paper. This information is confidential.

  • Fever (over 38 degrees Celsius)
  • New or worsening cough 
  • Difficulty breathing/shortness of breath
  • Sudden loss of smell or taste
  • Gastric symptoms i.e., diarrhea, nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle aches, fatigue, headache, chills, sore throat

Also check for the following:

  • Have they travelled outside of Canada within the past 14 days?
  • Have they had contact with someone with a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19 or someone who has just travelled outside of Canada within the last 14 days?

A no touch thermometer is used when a staff member enters the office to ensure that they do not have a fever. 

Anyone who answers yes to any of the above (or displays a fever on the no touch thermometer) is informed of their obligation to leave the office space until they are able to return in accordance with established health standards. Individuals who receive a positive COVID-19 result are informed that they must notify their employer according to the instructions received from the Public Health Agency. For staff members who present with symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, it is recommended that they get tested, as they will receive the results sooner than 14 days (the amount of days they will need to quarantine), and can resume work at the office space once they have the negative result and have been symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours. (See appendix A)

☐ If a staff member tests positive for COVID-19:

  • They must inform Lesley Bramhill, General Manager of PWM, immediately. The office space must then be closed and completely disinfected. 
  • PWM should consult with Santé Publique, who will investigate and determine whether those who have been in contact with the individual who tested positive may report to work or not. 
  • It is recommended, however, that PWM err on the side of caution and have all staff members who had contact with the infected individual within the last 48 hours be tested, and remain closed until they receive their results.
  • Those who receive negative test results may resume work at the office. Those who receive positive test results must quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and 48 hours without a fever. (See appendix A)
  • It is recommended to have a contingency plan for office work if this were to happen (e.g., working from home).

If a staff member lives with someone who presents with one of the symptoms listed above:

  • The individual with the symptom(s) should be tested. 
  • The staff member should remain home until the test results are in.  If they are negative, they may resume activities as usual.  
  • If the person they live with tests positive, the staff member must quarantine or get tested.  If they quarantine and no symptoms develop, they may resume activities after 14 days. If they get tested, and it is positive, they quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours.  If it is negative, they can resume activities but ONLY if they or the family member who tested positive are quarantined from each other and there are no shared spaces between them. 
  • If the person they live with ONLY has a runny nose and no other symptoms, no testing or quarantine is necessary.

All staff members are informed of the prevention measures implemented in the company to reduce and control the risks associated with COVID-19 along with the importance of complying with them.

Working from home should be prioritized when possible.

When 2 or more staff are working in the office, wherever possible, the physical distance of 2 metres is maintained from the start to the end of the work period and during breaks and meals. If a staff member is in a private office (by themselves), or if a staff member is sitting at a desk 2 metres away from other staff members, they may remove their masks. Masks are otherwise worn at all times. This includes when preparing food/coffee/tea, when going to the washroom, when entering a private office, when entering the creative space, when entering and leaving the shared office space, when interacting with another staff member, etc.

If only 1 staff member is working in the office, it is not necessary to wear a mask, except upon entering and exiting the office, and when going to the washroom.

Staff members are asked to supply their own masks. Masks are worn for a maximum of 4 hours. If a workday consists of 8 hours, individuals will have 2 masks to use for the day. 

When masks are not being worn, they should be removed completely from the face and placed in a secure, clean location. They should not be worn on the chin, or on the back of the head. (See Appendix B for instructions on how to properly put on a mask)

Water and soap or a hydro-alcoholic solution with an alcohol concentration of at least 60% is available in sensitive areas for hand washing (entrance, washroom, kitchen, creative space, office space).

One person at a time may work in each of the private offices. Another individual may work at the individual desk in the shared space, and one person may work at the white shared table. The desk under the hanging plants is not a shared desk and is only used by the Artistic & Administrative Associate.

A cleaning checklist is used and filled out on a daily basis to ensure that all areas, objects, and surfaces have been cleaned appropriately and at the right frequency.

If there are 2 or more staff in the office, frequently touched surfaces and common areas, e.g., door handles, taps, toilets, fridge handle, microwave, coffee machine, telephones, computer accessories, tables, etc. (all to be included on cleaning checklist) are disinfected every 4 hours of work (e.g., during lunch break and at the end of the day). Office staff do not need to leave the space during cleaning. Depending on the number of staff in the office, it is recommended to have a schedule in place (e.g., assign a different person to clean each day of the week). Cleaning time should be included during working hours and planned accordingly.

If there is only 1 staff member in the office, ONLY what they have touched is sanitized before they leave for the day (e.g., their desk, doorknobs, kitchen area, etc.).

Any common objects that are used frequently and could be possibly shared amongst staff are cleaned before and after each use (e.g. tables, chair backs, pens, photocopier, etc.).

Staff members bring their own paper, writing materials, and water bottle and do not share with others.

Staff members have their own cubby to store their personal belongings and do not share with others. For staff members with a private office, these items can be kept in their office. 

☐ Each staff member/guest has a designated hook at the front entrance to hang their coat and umbrella and to place their boots.

Each staff member uses their own cutlery and dishes (knife, fork, bowl, plate, coffee cup, etc.) and do not share with others. These are to be washed after use and stored in their cubby.

If necessary, signage (e.g., floor markings) is put in place to establish the minimum physical distance of 2 metres near high traffic areas such as the kitchen, by the photocopier, etc.

Whenever possible, the use of shared office equipment such as the photocopier is eliminated. When use of such equipment is unavoidable, hand hygiene and equipment wipe down is performed before and after use. A disinfectant is kept next to the photocopier.

Hand hygiene, respiratory etiquette, and physical distancing rules are posted throughout the space and followed (e.g., kitchen, washroom, entrance, creative space, shared office space, etc.).

Non-essential items (magazines, newspapers, and knick-knacks) are removed from common areas. It is recommended that the section of the shared office space with the couch be blocked off from use (with tape, signs, etc.). If this is not possible then the area is wiped down after every use (and added to the cleaning checklist).

The books located on the bookshelves should not be used unless absolutely necessary. As books cannot be properly sanitized, if a book IS used, it should be placed in a plastic bag with the date on it, then placed in a closed bin for 72 hours, then returned to the bookshelf.

Garbage is thrown out in the appropriate bins (paper towels in the bin by the kitchen sink and all other material in the garbage by the entrance).

Animals are permitted in the office as there is no indication that they transmit the virus to humans.

The kitchen/dining area is disinfected every four hours (during lunch break and at the end of the day). This includes any surface area that may have been touched (counters, table, microwave, kettle, coffee maker, sink, faucet, paper towel dispenser, fridge door handles, etc.).

As face coverings cannot be worn during eating, adequate eating space (minimum of 2 metres) is provided to ensure physical distancing can be maintained as well as while waiting for food to be prepared (e.g., when using microwave).

Hand washing facilities and/or hand sanitizer is readily accessible in the kitchen/eating area and is used when entering and leaving the area.

Staff members use their own dishes and wash and dry them immediately after use. Dishes are washed with dish soap and water with a sponge and then dried with either paper towel or a drying towel. If a drying towel is used, it should be washed daily. Dishes are then stored in the staff member’s individual cubby. The drying rack is removed from the counter.

All eating surfaces are cleaned and disinfected before and after use.

Staff members are discouraged from leaving the job site to obtain food during the course of the workday, whenever possible, however it is not prohibited. If an individual leaves they should follow the guidelines put into place by the government.

Food and beverages are not shared amongst staff members.

Microwave: The handle of the microwave as well as the buttons are wiped down both BEFORE and AFTER use. A mask is worn when using the microwave. Sanitizer (a container of wipes or spray and paper towels) is kept next to the microwave at all times, as well as a sign with instructions.

Coffee maker: The individual making the coffee sanitizes their hands before preparing the coffee. The buttons and the handle of the coffee maker are wiped BEFORE and AFTER use. When preparing or pouring the coffee, a mask is worn (even if a distance of 2 metres is being maintained, or they are the only individual in the room). Sanitizer (a container of wipes or spray and paper towels) is kept next to the coffee maker at all times as well as a sign with instructions.

Kettle: The individual using the kettle sanitizes their hands before its use. The buttons and the handle of the kettle are wiped BEFORE and AFTER use. When filling the kettle with water, or pouring water from the kettle, a mask is worn (even if a distance of 2 metres is being maintained, or they are the only individual in the room). Sanitizer (a container of wipes or spray and paper towels) is kept next to the coffee maker at all times as well as a sign with instructions.

Fridge: The handle of the fridge is wiped down both BEFORE and AFTER use and a mask is worn while using the fridge. Individual’s food is kept in containers or bags and does not touch anyone else’s food. Food not used is removed/brought home at the end of the day.

Staff members disinfect their hands before and after use of the washroom, and minimize the amount of surface area that they touch.

When using the washroom, hands are washed before taking the washroom key from the hook in the shared office. 

A mask is worn on the way to the washroom, in the washroom, and returning from the washroom.

Though the washrooms have two stalls, only one person at a time may use the washroom. The individual using the washroom indicates the washroom is in use using the system provided.

Washrooms are disinfected after each use. This includes wiping any surface area that was touched (e.g., top of toilet seat, toilet handle or flusher, faucet handles, hand dryer/paper towel dispenser, door knob on inside and outside of washroom. Disinfecting wipes or spray are kept in the washroom for this purpose.

Upon return from the washroom, the staff member disinfects the key, places it back on the hook, and then disinfects their hands. Adequate supplies of soap, hand sanitizer, paper towels, and toilet tissue are maintained.

This policy is for PWM staff and individual artists, volunteers, or contractors who are using the PWM creative studio for artistic activities that require gathering in person.

Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal (PWM) validates with all individuals coming into the creative space their state of health and that they have none of the following symptoms. All individuals will fill out a form OR sign-in sheet verifying this information before each workday. This is done digitally or on paper. This information is confidential.

  • Fever (over 38 degrees Celsius)
  • New or worsening cough 
  • Difficulty breathing/shortness of breath
  • Sudden loss of smell or taste
  • Gastric symptoms i.e., diarrhea, nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle aches, fatigue, headache, chills, sore throat

Also check for the following:

  • Have they travelled outside of Canada within the past 14 days?
  • Have they had contact with someone with a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19 or someone who has just travelled outside of Canada within the last 14 days?

A no touch thermometer is used when an individual enters the creative space to ensure that they do not have a fever. 

Anyone who answers yes to any of the above (or displays a fever on the no touch thermometer) is informed of their obligation to leave the creative space until they are able to return in accordance with established health standards. Individuals who receive a positive COVID-19 result are informed that they must notify PWM according to the instructions received from the Public Health Agency. For individuals who present with symptoms or have been exposed, it is recommended that they get tested, as they will receive the results sooner than 14 days (the amount of days they will need to quarantine), and can resume activities in the creative space once they have the negative result and have been symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours. (See appendix A)

If an individual using the creative space tests positive for COVID-19:

  • They must inform Lesley Bramhill, General Manager of PWM, immediately. The creative space AND office space (due to having to go through the office to get to the creative space) must then be closed and completely disinfected. 
  • PWM should consult with Santé Publique, who will investigate and determine whether those who have been in contact with the individual who tested positive may report to work or not. 
  • It is recommended, however, that PWM err on the side of caution and have all individuals who had contact with the infected individual within the last 48 hours be tested, and remain closed until they receive their results.
  • Those who receive negative test results may resume activities in the creative space. Those who receive positive test results must quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and 48 hours without a fever. (See appendix A)

If an individual using the creative space lives with someone who presents with one of the symptoms listed above:

  • The individual with the symptom should be tested. 
  • The individual using the creative space should remain home until the test results are in.  If they are negative, they may resume activities as usual.  
  • If the person they live with tests positive, the individual using the creative space must quarantine or get tested.  If they quarantine and no symptoms develop, they may resume activities after 14 days. If they get tested, and it is positive, they quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours.  If it is negative, they can resume activities but ONLY if they or the person they live with who tested positive are quarantined from each other and there are no shared spaces between them. 
  • If the person they live with ONLY has a runny nose and no other symptoms, no testing or quarantine is necessary.

All individuals entering the creative space have been informed of the prevention measures implemented in the company to reduce and control the risks associated with COVID-19 along with the importance of complying with them.

If possible, workshops are held in a digital/online format. Prior to an in-person workshop, a survey is sent to artists, facilitators, partners, and collaborators to assess both the creative needs and individual boundaries, comfort, and risk level. PWM will consider the needs of the artistic work and whether gathering is necessary and essential in order to move the creation process forward. Based on the answers from the survey and the needs of the artistic work, the PWM dramaturg will decide if the activity will take place: 

  • in person;
  • in a digital format; or
  • in a hybrid version of in-person and digital formats.

In the creative space, wherever possible, the physical distance of 2 metres is maintained from the start to the end of the work period and during breaks and meals. If ONLY table work is being done, and all individuals involved are able to maintain a distance of at least 2 metres, masks can be taken off once everyone is sitting down. Masks are worn at all other times. This includes when individuals get up from the table, are doing any movement work, going into the office space, into the kitchen, or to the washroom. Masks are always worn upon entering the creative space, leaving the creative space, and during breaks.

Individuals using the creative space are asked to supply their own masks. Masks are worn for a maximum of 4 hours. If a workday consists of 8 hours, individuals have 2 masks to use for the day.

When masks are not being worn, they should be removed completely from the face and placed in a secure, clean location. They should not be worn on the chin or on the back of the head. (See Appendix B for instructions on how to properly put on a mask)

Each individual using the creative space is given their own personal basket in which to store their personal belongings for the duration of their time in the creative space. Individuals bring their own coffee mug, water bottle, pen, paper, highlighter, and any other material they might need. These items should not be shared with others. It is the responsibility of that individual to disinfect these items at the end of the day. 

☐ Each individual using the creative space is designated a hook at the front entrance to hang their coat and umbrella and to place their boots.

☐ Scripts and other printouts are not shared amongst individuals. One copy for each individual is printed out or is e-mailed to the individual to print out or read on iPad, tablet, or e-reader.

The number of people in the creative space is reduced so as to allow the minimum distance of 2 metres between people to be respected. As the creative space has a square footage of 929 sq.ft., ideally a maximum of 8-12 people should be in the space at any given time, depending on the configuration of the tables, and whether there is movement required.

Physical contact is avoided, including shaking hands, “high-fives,” fist or elbow bumps, or hugging. 

When possible, stagger start and call times to limit the number of individuals in the creative space at any one time.

Non-essential visitors to the space are restricted. If visitors are provided access, they are subject to the same guidance as staff members and those using the creative space, including the need for symptom screening and PPE requirements.

Water and soap or a hydro-alcoholic solution with an alcohol concentration of at least 60% is available in sensitive areas for hand washing (entrance, washroom, kitchen, creative space, office space).

Limit as much as possible the amount of props, objects, and set pieces used in the creative space. If props are to be shared, individuals disinfect their hands before AND after use, and the prop should be wiped down immediately after its shared use. If it is possible to wipe it down between being passed from one person to the next, this is done.

Any equipment (microphones, headsets, technical equipment), props, instruments, and set pieces that will be used in the creative space are cleaned and disinfected before and after use. It is recommended to identify who is responsible for this and to include it on the cleaning checklist.

Individuals who handle sets, equipment, objects, or props during a rehearsal frequently wash their hands. 

Individuals using the creative space can use the kitchen in order to make coffee and must follow the guidelines mentioned above when doing so. Individuals are asked to bring their own water bottle, lunch, and snacks and to keep these things in their own personal containers/lunchboxes. Garbage should be thrown out in the appropriate bins (paper towels in the bin by the kitchen sink and all other material in the garbage by the entrance).

This policy is for PWM staff and individual artists, volunteers, or contractors who are using the PWM creative studio for artistic activities that require gathering in person for livestreaming or performances.

During livestreaming performances, individuals do not need to wear a mask IF the blocking maintains a minimum distance of 2 metres between ALL cast members and there is no physical contact. Physical contact or close proximity (less than 2 metres) may be allowed if all other safety precautions have been met AND the actors wear a mask.

Any equipment (microphones, headsets, technical equipment), props, instruments, and set pieces that will be used during livestream performance are cleaned and disinfected before and after use. It is recommended to identify who is responsible for this and to include it on the cleaning checklist.

Individuals who handle sets, equipment, objects, or props during a performance frequently wash their hands.

Limit as much as possible the amount of props, objects, and set pieces used during livestream performances. If props are to be shared, individuals should disinfect their hands before AND after use, and the prop should be wiped down immediately after its shared use. If it is possible to wipe it down between being passed from one person to the next, this should be done.

Each actor should have their own makeup kit.

Personal equipment (such as tools, headsets, microphones, and radios) shall be cleaned both before AND after being issued.

If possible, equipment such as radios/walkie-talkies/headsets shall be issued to a single individual and used exclusively by that person for the duration of production. If equipment must be shared between individuals, the item shall be wiped down before and after use, and hand hygiene shall be performed after handling.

When possible, stagger start and call times to limit the number of individuals in the creative space at any one time.

New clothes are washed or left aside for a minimum of 3 hours before a fitting. Clothes or costumes that have been tried on are set aside and washed or steamed or left for a minimum of 3 hours before being tried on by another artist or made available to the production.

Fittings are done in isolated spaces and with one cast member at a time. 

The cast member being fitted as well as the costume designer disinfect their hands both before and after the fitting.

Costume designers or anyone who handles the clothes or costumes wash their hands frequently. 

Clothes or costumes are kept in individual plastic covers or brought home by each individual at the end of every rehearsal or performance.

Clothes or costumes worn are washed with the usual laundry soap or dry-cleaned. (See “Linens, clothing, and laundry items” section for more details) A mask AND eye protection (goggles or a visor covering the face up to the chin) are provided to the costume designer (or anyone handling costumes) when completing a task that requires being within 2 metres of another person (e.g., measurements, fittings, etc.).

SITES INTERNET

  1. INSTRUCTIONS FOR PEOPLE WHO HAVE SYMPTOMS
    OR HAVE BEEN IN CONTACT WITH A CONFIRMED CASE OF COVID-19

You must either

  • Get tested for COVID-19. 

This is the recommended course of action because the individual will receive the results within a matter of days. If the results are negative, they can resume normal activities.

OR

  • Quarantine for 14 days. 
    • If you do not develop symptoms, you can end your quarantine 14 days after your last contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19.
    • If you do develop symptoms, you can end your isolation 14 days after the onset of your symptoms and:
      • You have had no fever for 48 hours without using fever medicine.
      • You have had no symptoms for at least 24 hours except for cough and loss of smell, which may last longer. These recommendations are mandatory even if you test negative for COVID-19 prior to the end of the 14 days, because you can develop the infection up to 14 days from the contact.
  1. YOU HAVE BEEN TESTED FOR COVID-19

You tested positive

You can end your period of isolation 14 days after the onset of your symptoms and:

  • You have had no fever for at least 48 hours without using fever medicine.
  • You have had no acute symptoms for at least 24 hours except for cough and loss of smell, which can last longer.
  • A second test may be recommended to confirm that you no longer have COVID-19.

You tested negative

A second test may be recommended to confirm that you do not have COVID-19. If a second test is not necessary or is negative, you can end your period of isolation 24 hours after the end of your symptoms and 48 hours without a fever.

https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/b/1/csm_20-210-64W_laver-les-mains_ef83e7854e.png?0Wash your hands before use of the face covering, also called handcrafted mask.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/a/a/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_etape-fixez-derriere-oreilles_8013421ea7.png?0With one hand, place the face covering over your nose and mouth. Use your other hand to attach it behind your ears with the elastic or string loops.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/0/a/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_etape-ajustez-nez_424cbec29e.png?0Adjust the face covering to your nose.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/7/4/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_etape-ajustez-menton_dbf5f60885.png?0Now adjust it under your chin.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/b/1/csm_20-210-64W_laver-les-mains_ef83e7854e.png?0Wash your hands after use of the face covering.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/5/7/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_humide_bdf177c693.png?0Change your face covering if it becomes moist, soiled or damaged.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/6/b/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_sur-le-cou_7168cc7b47.png?0Do not leave the face covering hanging from your neck or an ear. Keep it on your face and avoid touching it. If you do touch your face covering while wearing it, wash your hands thoroughly as soon as possible.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/e/2/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_retirer_b6ce064121.png?0Remove your face covering by the elastic or string loops without touching the front.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/6/6/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_laver_1b3fb8642b.png?0Fold the outer parts of the face covering together and place it in a clean bag. You may wash the face covering as soon as you get home, along with the rest of the laundry.

WARNING – FACE COVERING DOES NOT REPLACE THE FOLLOWING:

  • Hand washing
  • Physical distancing (2 metres)
  • Isolation at home if you are sick

GENERAL

  • For general cleaning (wiping down kitchen, washroom, tables, door knobs, etc.), a spray solution (containing alcohol or bleach) may be used (along with paper towel). A store-bought product can be used, or a bleach solution can be made with the following ratio: 4 cups of water (1 litre) to 2 teaspoons of bleach. Bleach solutions are effective for disinfection for up to 24 hours, so should be discarded and re-made on a daily basis. Use water at room temperature for dilution. Label diluted cleaning solutions.
  • Disinfecting wipes may also be used for general cleaning. (See electronics section for recommendations)
  • Wear disposable gloves when cleaning and disinfecting surfaces. Gloves should be discarded after each cleaning. If reusable gloves are used, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other purposes. 
  • Wash or disinfect hands both before and after the use of gloves.
  • If surfaces are dirty, they are cleaned using a detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

ELECTRONICS

  • Turn off the equipment, unplug the power cord from the wall or power strip, and remove the battery from portable or wireless keyboards and mice before the cleaning process.
  • Do not use disinfectant wipes containing bleach, disinfectant sprays, aerosol sprays or anything abrasive.
  • Do not use an extremely damp disinfectant wipe to clean the area. If you encounter a very damp wipe it may need to be squeezed to remove the excess liquid before use.
  • Do not allow the liquid from the disinfectant wipe to sit or pool on the area being disinfected for a long amount of time.
  • Do not use rough towels or cloths to dry the area.
  • Do not use excess force when disinfecting the area around the keyboard; this could damage the keys.
  • Use a disinfectant wipe to wipe the area first, then use a damp, soft, lint-free cloth, and finally dry the area with another soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Suggested products (the following products are safe to use on electronics and can also be used to wipe down frequently touched surfaces, the washroom, kitchen, etc.):

LINENS, CLOTHING AND LAUNDRY ITEMS:

Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry and then discard after each use. 

If using reusable gloves, those gloves are dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and are not used for other purposes. Disinfect hands before and after the use of gloves.

If possible, do not shake dirty laundry. This will minimize the possibility of dispersing the virus through the air.

Launder items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items. Clean and disinfect clothes hampers regularly. If possible, consider placing a bag liner that is either disposable (can be thrown away) or can be laundered.

Those procedures were developed in August 2020 by Lindsay Petts, M.A.
You can download a printable version of our procedures here.

Any question? Call Lindsay Petts at 514-880-8708.

2020-2021 PWM + MAI joint support for artists* interested in working with a dramaturg

Hero image for post - 2020-2021 PWM+
IMPORTANT:
Applicants can apply to more than one partnership program at Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal, but can only be the recipient of one partnership program.

PWM is an English language minority company and therefore the work with PWM will take place in English. The application must be completed in English.

Artists who have already applied to the MAI’s artist support program Alliance can apply to this partnership program, but can only be the recipient of one MAI program at a time.
We are thrilled to announce that PLAYWRIGHTS’ WORKSHOP MONTRÉAL AND MAI (MONTRÉAL, ARTS INTERCULTURELS) have joined forces to create a joint support for artists* interested in working with a dramaturg! 

The following artists are eligible to submit proposals: Indigenous artists (First Nations, Métis, and Inuit), racialized artists (including racialized recent immigrants), members of the 2SLGBTQQIPAA+ communities and/or deaf, hearing-impaired, neurodiverse or differently abled artists as well as artists living with disabilities and chronic diseases.

*We accept applications from artists in theatre, performance, dance, circus, interdisciplinary arts and visual arts (with a performance component) if they are interested in collaborating with a dramaturg from theatre and performance.

PWM logo

Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal (PWM) is a national new creation centre for theatre and performance led by a team of dramaturgs and arts administrators. While playwriting has been at the core of what we do for over 50 years, our work now strives to include devised and interdisciplinary forms of creation. In addition to seeking collaborations across diverse artistic practices, we are strongly committed to supporting work which reflects a wide range of cultural identities and lived experiences. 

Hosting 10-15 artists, collectives and companies per year, MAI’s Alliance program is a unique artist support initiative conceived for practitioners from all fields who encounter systemic and structural obstacles. The program strives to eliminate barriers to their full participation in the arts by offering financial allocations and guidance that are adapted to the learning and creative needs and desires of each participant. 

What is dramaturgy and what do we do? 

Dramaturgy is an exploration of all the elements that make a work, how they are brought together to create meaning, and what the process for developing that work might be. PWM primarily works on projects that centre text and narrative but also on pieces where text and storytelling are not the primary components or concerns.

PWM’s work centres around the artist and our dynamic collaborative process is tailored to meet the needs of their project. We listen deeply to understand who an artist is, what they are making and how they want their work to evolve. We offer feedback and reflection through questions and conversation and often accompany the artists from draft to draft or iteration to iteration. We work one-on-one, but also through workshops and residencies.

For us, dramaturgy must also consider the reverberations/implications of a piece of performance through time and space, and beyond the room/page in/on which it is being created. 

Refer to the Artist’s guide (PDF) for more details about what this joint mentorship includes, eligibility criteria and other conditions.

SUPPORT
PROVIDED

Personalized project coordination support

$5,000 fund allocation (refer to “MAI’s allocations: How they work” for more information)

Training and collective reflection opportunities

Access to the MAI rehearsal studios

30 hours with a dramaturg, including a 20-hour workshop if relevant

The PWM + MAI joint support for artists* interested in working with a dramaturg is not a grant program. It offers an allocation of funds  ($5,000) for the artists to establish mentorships and collaborations, supporting their learning and creation process (for example, to work with a mentor, a sound designer, a choreographer, a grant writer, or other experts and collaborators). Please see the toolbox’s document ‘MAI’s allocations: how they work’ for more information about what is eligible and ineligible.

The deadline to submit applications is September 27, 2020 at 11:59PM. All applicants will be notified of the results by the end of November 2020. 

project supported by the City of Montreal, the Government of Quebec, and the Canada Council for the Arts
Canada Council logo

Black lives matter.

Artists have forever been agents of cultural change with the ability to illustrate political truths, direct resistance, and inspire reform. 

Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal stands in solidarity with our community in demanding justice and change. We  condemn Quebec Premier François Legault’s denial of systemic racism in Quebec.

We stand with all creators fighting for social justice and equity. 


If you are looking for ways to get help, or want to provide support please visit the following links:

Write to your local representatives

to condemn Premier Legault’s groundless comments on the “non-existence of systemic racism in Québec” made on June 1st during an official press conference. 

Here is a template you can use

Write to your city officials to defund the police

Here is a template for the City of Montreal


Resources to keep learning and stay informed:

Consult this great round-up of resources collected by the Quebec Drama Federation

Read and learn about what Black-led associations and organizations are doing. You can consult this master list of Black community organisations in Montreal compiled by BlackMontreal

Consult the website of the Center for Research-Action on Race Relations (CRARR)

Scaffolded Anti-racism resources (an extensive list of resources organized by stage)

Anti-racism resources for white people (another comprehensive list of resources)

#BlackLivesMtlSyllabus– Montreal specific reading syllabus compiled by Robyn Maynard, author of Policing Black Lives: State Violence in Canada from Slavery to Present

White Supremacy Culture in Organizations by COCo (Centre for Community Organizations)

Added June 17, 2020:

Articule’s Open letter to artist-run centres in Québec: Moving Beyond Statements of Solidarity (a bilingual resource)

Racial Equity Tools

Young Creators Unit – 2020 Showcase

An extraordinary showcase for an extraordinary year!

We are taking our Young Creators Unit showcase live to YouTube for TWO nights of staged readings from new work by emerging theatre creators.

We are so excited and proud to present to you this year’s Young Creators Unit. After an exceptional year of digging in and dynamic creation, these participants took on the challenge of finishing our time together in the current socially distant reality. We held together virtually as a group, and now want to welcome audiences at home to join our circle and witness some of the work in development.

JESSE STONG
Young Creators Unit Leader

Every year we produce two evenings of readings where creators from our Young Creators Unit (YCU) read excerpts of their work to an enthusiastic audience of peers and theatre community leaders. Because of the confinement put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been working with this year’s 18 YCU members to capture the readings on video.

At 8PM EST on May 29th and 30th, we will showcase their work on Youtube Live with introductions and commentary by YCU leader Jesse Stong. Join us virtually on this page, or directly on YouTube. Watching the showcase on our YouTube channel also gives you access to a live chat where the artists and our staff will be present to answer your questions and have a good time!

Keep scrolling to access the livestreams on this page and learn more about the playwrights.

Night 1

LIVE Friday, May 29th at 8PM EST

Click on a playwright to learn about their work


Night 2

LIVE Saturday, May 30th at 8PM EST

Click on a playwright to learn about their work

About the Young Creators Unit

Thanks to generous funding from Canadian Heritage and the Zeller Family Foundation, and the dedicated mentorship of PWM dramaturg Jesse Stong, the Young Creators Unit has become a mainstay for young Canadian playwrights. Since its beginnings in 2015, YCU has supported more than a hundred young artists as they take risks, develop their voices and find their place in Canadian theatre.

More about the Young Creators Unit.

Canadian Heritage_Logo

Livestream: Writers’ Warm-up by Jesse Stong

Every Monday and Friday, start your morning on the right creative foot with a dynamic writing activity facilitated by Playwright and PWM Dramaturg Jesse Stong!

Video of the first Writers’ Warm-up, April 06 2020

Storytelling is important. The stories we tell and how we tell them say a lot about our identities.

Unfortunately, in these times of physical distancing and heightened anxiety, it can be hard, as a writer, to get going in the morning. Life block is writer’s block, your life is part of your story and what blocks you in life will block you in your stories as well.

To help unfreeze our quarantine-addled minds, Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal own Jesse Stong helps us kickstart our days live on YouTube, every Monday and Friday at 10:15 AM, with 15-minute hands-on activities designed to support new, emerging and established storytellers!

Tune-in to our Youtube channel here
(and while you are there, do not forget to subscribe to stay up-to-date with our latest videos!)

About Jesse Stong

Jesse Stong is a proud father of twins, a graduate of Playwriting from the National Theatre School of Canada, and received his Master’s in Art Education from Concordia University.

He is an award-winning artist, dramaturg, and educator. Over the years, he has supported over 100 emerging Canadian storytellers as director of our Young Creators Unit. He also leads our New Stories Project Unit for artist with different abilities.

Jesse was recently Manager of Children’s Programming for Watchmojo.com, Associate Curator for the National Arts Centre Disability Summit, and Host of the Montreal English Theatre Awards. He is currently developing an intermedia puppetry project launching fall 2020.