APPLY NOW: Writing the political through the personal with Carmen Aguirre

Note:
due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this workshop will take place remotely.
Contact harris@playwrights.ca for any questions about the workshop.

This five-day workshop led by theatre artist and author Carmen Aguirre is focused on writing that taps into personal experiences, with the goal of generating content leading to the creation of a one-person show or a multi-character play.

Using an exercise from Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed canon to kickstart the writing process, the group will explore personal stories that are intentionally set within a larger social, political, and historical context. 

The workshop will tackle the challenge of writing works which are meant to speak to universal experience as opposed to a writing process meant only for personal catharsis. Participants will also begin to learn how to wrap the personal and the political around each other effectively. The workshop will address questions such as: how do I write about personal experience without being self-indulgent? Why would anybody care about my personal story? How do I enter into a dialogue with the audience through my personal story, as opposed to using a personal story to enter into a dialogue with myself? How do I write about political issues that are important to me through personal story?


Schedule:

(5-day virtual workshop)

1PM to 4PM EST every day
Monday, December 14 to Friday, December 18, 2020.

Location:

The workshop will take place remotely via video-conferencing software.


Application Instructions

  • Please attach a bio and/or CV as well as a brief paragraph detailing your interest in the workshop.
  • Send applications to harris@playwrights.ca with subject line: Exploring Practice with Carmen Aguirre.
  • Apply before  1 PM on November 26, 2020 to ensure that your application will be considered.
  • Please note that the number of spots are very limited.

About the instructor

Carmen Aguirre is a Chilean-Canadian, award-winning theatre artist and author who has written and co-written over twenty-five plays, including Chile Con Carne, The Refugee Hotel, The Trigger, Blue Box, Broken Tailbone, and Anywhere But Here, as well as the #1 international bestseller Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter (winner of CBC Canada Reads 2012), and its bestselling sequel, Mexican Hooker #1 and My Other Roles Since the Revolution.

She is currently writing an adaptation of Euripides’ Medea for Vancouver’s Rumble Theatre, Moliere’s The Learned Ladies for Toronto’s Factory Theatre, a short digital piece for Ontario’s Stratford Festival entitled Floating Life, and an untitled play on the life of famed twentieth century Italian photographer and revolutionary Tina Modotti for Vancouver’s Electric Company Theatre. Reframed, an outdoor performance piece about online discourse, conceived and co-created with The Electric Company, received its world premiere on October 7th, 2020, in Vancouver, commissioned by Ottawa’s National Arts Centre for its Grand Acts of Theatre initiative.

Carmen is a Core Artist at Electric Company Theatre, a co-founding member of the Canadian Latinx Theatre Artist Coalition (CALTAC), and has over eighty film, TV, and stage acting credits, including her award-winning lead role in the Canadian premiere of Stephen Adley Guirgis’ The Motherfucker with the Hat, and her Leo-nominated lead performance in the independent feature film Bella Ciao!. She looks forward to starring in Cecilia Araneda’s stunning debut feature film, Intersection, to be shot in Winnipeg in Spring 2021. Carmen is presently on the 2020 Siminovitch Prize shortlist, the most prestigious theatre award in Canada. She is a graduate of Studio 58.

carmenaguirre.ca

WITH THE collaboration of
Imago Theatre logo
This workshop is financially supported by
Emploi-Québec and Compétence Culture Logos

Welcome to our Digital Dramaturgy Clinic!

Do you have a performance piece you have been working on for some time, with concepts you want to fold into your work but do not know how to accomplish technically or digitally?

Perhaps you are at the early stages of your next creation, and want to gather information and knowledge on what is possible on a technical and digital level?

Or maybe you had a piece originally intended for live performance, and want to carry it over in a digital format?

“I want to write holograms into my piece, how would holograms work on stage?”

This digital dramaturgy “first-aid” program offers creators a one-time session (up to 2 hours) with tech and digital specialists Emily Soussana & Andrew Scriver (otherwise known as potatoCakes_digital), to discuss their creation and the technical questions they might have. 

After learning about your goals, Emily and Andrew will help you brainstorm and offer possible technical or digital solutions to your needs. They can discuss the technical processes required, as well as potential story-driven digital concepts to best translate your piece digitally. 

HOW IT WORKS

The Digital Dramaturgy Clinic is an ongoing program, artists in need of assistance should contact Emily & Andrew at potatocakesdigital@playwrights.ca with a short synopsis of their work and the question they wish to address, so that the session can be prepared in advance.

Further consultation can be scheduled if appropriate. This program is set up to help you identify the expertise and technology you need to realize your vision.

project supported by
the FOUNDATION OF GREATER Montréal COVID-19 Collective Fund

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE TRANSLATION 2020

A one-on-one mentorship opportunity

For years Playwrights’ Workshop Montreal (PWM) and the Centre des auteurs dramatiques (CEAD) have worked to forge links between French and English language theatre communities and foster the art of theatre translation. To this end, the two organizations have once again partnered together to offer two individualized mentorships meant to familiarize playwrights to the craft of theatre translation. The mentorship described below is focused on French to English theatre translation. Details on the English to French translation component of this mentorship can be found on the CEAD’s website.

How the mentorship works:

  • PWM will select 1 participant with an interest in French to English theatre translation;
  • Over a period of several months, the participant will translate excerpts (roughly 10-12 pages) of two contemporary Québécois plays selected by the CEAD;
  • Over several weeks, the participant will receive a total of 12 hours of dramaturgical support from acclaimed playwright and theatre translator Alexis Diamond;
  • The participant will have the opportunity to discuss their translations with the original playwrights;
  • The mentorship will culminate in two 4-hour workshops during which professional actors will read and discuss the newly-translated excerpts;
  • The participant will then have the chance to meet with the second participant as well as both mentors to present their work and discuss their experiences;
  • After the workshops, the participant will submit their final drafts of the translated excerpts to the CEAD.

Who can apply?

  • Montreal-based playwrights with a strong interest in French-to-English theatre translation;
  • The candidate must have excellent writing skills in English and have fluent comprehension of Québecois French;
  • Playwrights with little to no experience in theatre translation are encouraged to apply;
  • Applicants must have a minimum of two professionally produced pieces or Fringe productions. 

Application Guidelines

Send your application, documents, as well as any questions you may have to Harris Frost at harris@playwrights.ca.

The deadline to apply is Monday, October 26th at noon.

Please include the following attachments (preferably as PDFs) in your application email:

  1. Your artistic CV and/or bio;
  2. A brief cover letter outlining your interest in this mentorship and in French-to-English theatre translation more generally.


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

October 26th
Application deadline.

November 4th
Participant selected and provided with excerpts.

November – March
Several meetings with translation mentor, translation of excerpts and meetings with playwrights.

Before March 6th
2x 4-hour workshops of translated excerpts and final meeting with other participant.

Biography of Alexis Diamond


Alexis Diamond is a Montreal-based playwright, opera librettist, translator and theatre curator. Her award-winning plays, operas and translations for audiences of all ages have been presented across Canada, in the U.S. and in Europe. She also collaborates with several international artists on performance-installations involving text, movement and sound. In 2019, Alexis Diamond served as co-artistic director of the Jamais Lu festival, where she also presented a bilingual play, Faux-amis, with co-author Hubert Lemire, with support from the CALQ. In 2018, Alexis joined a multiyear project led by professor Erin Hurley (McGill University) on the history of Quebec’s English-language theatre.

This mentorship is made possible by:

Playwrights' Workshop Montréal Logo
CEAD LOGO
Compétence Culture Logo
Quebec Logo


2020-2021 AMPLIFIER: a fully supported exploratory creation process for playwrights

The deadline to apply to this program has passed!
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IMPORTANT:
Applicants can apply to more than one partnership program at Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal, but can only be the recipient of one partnership program.

PWM is an English language minority company and therefore the work with PWM will take place in English. The application must be completed in English.
We are thrilled to announce that Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal (PWM), LA SERRE–arts vivants (LA SERRE) and the Conseil des Arts de Montréal (CAM) are launching a new program offering comprehensive dramaturgical and artistic support to a professional playwright residing on the island of Montreal. This includes dramaturgical consultation, creation workshop, a creation production residency, followed by a laboratory presentation.

The following playwrights are eligible to submit proposals: Indigenous artists (First Nations, Métis, and Inuit), 1st or 2nd generation immigrant artists from a culturally diverse community*, or racialized artists.
Board Members of CAM, PWM and La Serre are not eligible to apply.

*As defined in the Conseil des Arts de Montréal’s glossary

In order to support artists writing in French and artists writing in English, this program is being offered alternately by the Centre des auteurs dramatiques (CEAD) in French one year, and by PWM in English every other year. This edition is intended for artists creating in the English language.

THE GOALS

The program aims to highlight the artistic and social contributions of theatre artists from culturally diverse, indigenous, or racialized communities working creatively in one of Canada’s official languages.

Additionally, it seeks to foster dialogue between Montréal’s English- and French-speaking theatre communities, as well as intercultural exchanges and greater representation from culturally diverse artists within the theatre community and on Montreal stages.

Refer to the Program Presentation (PDF) for more details about what this partnership includes, eligibility criteria and other conditions.

THE SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS

PWM logo

CONSEIL DES ARTS DE MONTRÉAL

Founded in 1956, the Conseil des arts de Montréal identifies, supports and recognizes excellence in the professional creation, production and dissemination of the arts.

To remain in tune with the organizations and collectives it serves, the Conseil relies on its knowledge of the communities, its innovative skills, and its ability to bring the city’s artists and financial partners together.

PLAYWRIGHTS’ WORKSHOP MONTRÉAL 

PWM is a national new creation centre for theatre and performance led by a team of dramaturgs and arts administrators. While playwriting has been at the core of what we do for over 50 years, our work now strives to include devised and interdisciplinary forms of creation. In addition to seeking collaborations across diverse artistic practices, we are strongly committed to supporting work which reflects a wide range of cultural identities and lived experiences. 

What is dramaturgy and what do we do?

Dramaturgy is an exploration of all the elements that make a work, how they are brought together to create meaning, and what the process for developing that work might be. PWM primarily works on projects that centre text and narrative but also on pieces where text and storytelling are not the primary components or concerns.

PWM’s work centres around the artist and our dynamic collaborative process is tailored to meet the needs of their project. We listen deeply to understand who an artist is, what they are making and how they want their work to evolve. We offer feedback and reflection through questions and conversation and often accompany the artists from draft to draft or iteration to iteration. We work one-on-one, but also through workshops and residencies.

For us, dramaturgy must also consider the reverberations/implications of a piece of performance through time and space, and beyond the room/page in/on which it is being created. 

LA SERRE–ARTS VIVANTS

LA SERRE is a structuring incubator for the improvement of the conditions under which emerging artists carry out their work in live art. It accompanies them in the expansion of their work, from the creation process to encounters with the public. It helps artists develop their autonomy, organizational maturity and artistic independence. LA SERRE acts as an activator of collaborations between artists and local, national and international partners, as well as artists from various artistic disciplines and other areas. Artistically, LA SERRE favors projects that establish evocative links between art and society, and facilitate connections between different disciplinary fields and sectors.

SUPPORT PROVIDED

The recipient of the program will receive a project creation grant of $13,000 by the CAM over two years, along with numerous services provided by PWM, LA SERRE, et CAM. This is a one-time, non-renewable grant.

The program takes place over two years, and support is provided as follows:

YEAR 1

$3,000 creation grant for a new theatrical creation

30 hours of dramaturgical collaboration with Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal

9 hours of script workshopping offered by Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal

A staged reading with actors at Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal

YEAR 2

$10,000 creation grant for production

40 hours of production and management mentorship by LA SERRE–arts vivants

60 hours of free access to the Conseil des Arts de Montréal’s studios

Presentation of two performances in lab format

One-year subscription to Machinerie des arts.

APPLICATION PROCESS

To apply, please complete the online application form. Refer to the Program Presentation (PDF) for all details about this partnership. During the application process, you will be asked to include the following documents:

  • An excerpt of a previously written theatrical work in English (10 pages maximum, PDF or DOC);
  • An excerpt of the project (10 pages maximum, PDF or DOC);
  • The author’s CV (PDF or DOC)

Only the required documents will be forwarded to members of the evaluation committee.

Applications will be evaluated by representatives of the CAM, PWM and La Serre. Projects will be evaluated based on merit, and the selection will take the projects’ comparative value into consideration. The evaluation committee will take into consideration diversity of practice, artists’ experience, accessibility needs, 2SLGBTQQIPAA+, and gender parity.

The deadline to submit applications is November 1, 2020 at 11:59PM. All applicants will be notified of the results by December 10, 2020. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

If you have any questions about the eligibility of your application or your project, do not hesitate to contact us. We prefer to have the opportunity to discuss hybrid theatrical forms, unusual professional backgrounds and multiple ethnocultural affiliations with applicants.

Please address questions to Emma Tibaldo, Executive and Artistic Director of Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal, at emma@playwrights.ca.

2020 COLE FOUNDATION MENTORSHIP FOR EMERGING TRANSLATORS

Deadline extended to October 18!

The translation of new work for the stage is a core part of Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal’s (PWM) programming. Since its inception in 2013, the Cole Foundation Mentorship for Emerging Translators (formerly Cole Competition for Emerging Translators) has been guiding the next generation of translators from French into English. 

With the expert guidance of acclaimed translator Maureen Labonté and in partnership with the Cole Foundation, PWM has built a program that mentors emerging translators through every stage of the process. The successful applicant to this year’s mentorship program will receive a $1,000 honorarium and an eight-month mentorship with Maureen Labonté which includes a workshop with actors and a public reading.

WHO CAN APPLY?

To be eligible, emerging translators must have completed at least one translation which has received a public reading, publication or production. Because the focus is on developing translators, the applicant must not have done more than three translations. 

WITH WHAT PLAY(S)?

Before applying for the Mentorship, emerging translators must choose the play they wish to translate and contact the playwright for permission: Establishing a connection to the play and the playwright in advance means that the applicant is already invested in the proposed work and would be in a position to begin work immediately following the announcement of the selected project.

Translations must be from French into English only. 

Full-length scripts, one acts or theatre for young people are all welcome. Please note, our expertise does not extend to the translation of musicals.

SUPPORT PROVIDED

The recipient of the program will receive $1000 honorarium, dramaturgical support from renowned translator, Maureen Labonté, and a translation workshop with actors.

APPLICATION PROCESS

To apply, please send us:

  • A one-page letter of intent describing the project, its challenges and your reasons for wanting to translate the work;
  • Your biography (maximum 250 words);
  • A copy of your chosen play;
  • Written permission from the original playwright of the play;
  • A 3 to 5 page sample of your previous translation work, please include the corresponding original text.

Send all the documents in one email to emma@playwrights.ca with the subject line “2020 Cole Foundation Mentorship for Emerging Translators – Application”. 

The deadline to submit applications is October 18, 2020 at 11:59PM. All applicants will be notified of the results.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

If you have any questions about the eligibility of your application or your project, do not hesitate to contact us. Please address questions to Emma Tibaldo, Executive and Artistic Director of Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal, at emma@playwrights.ca.

In partnership with

Logo of the Cole Foundation

Our COVID-19 safety procedures

Our office and creative space are reopening! WE DEVELOPED EXTENSIVE POLICIES TO KEEP OUR SPACE AS SAFE AS POSSIBLE and To protect our staff, artists, and visitors. Read on to know exactly how we are welcoming you back.

This policy is for staff and contractors working for PWM on a regular basis.

Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal (PWM) validates with the staff member their state of health and that they have none of the following symptoms. Staff members will fill out a form OR sign-in sheet verifying this information, before each workday. This is done digitally or on paper. This information is confidential.

  • Fever (over 38 degrees Celsius)
  • New or worsening cough 
  • Difficulty breathing/shortness of breath
  • Sudden loss of smell or taste
  • Gastric symptoms i.e., diarrhea, nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle aches, fatigue, headache, chills, sore throat

Also check for the following:

  • Have they travelled outside of Canada within the past 14 days?
  • Have they had contact with someone with a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19 or someone who has just travelled outside of Canada within the last 14 days?

A no touch thermometer is used when a staff member enters the office to ensure that they do not have a fever. 

Anyone who answers yes to any of the above (or displays a fever on the no touch thermometer) is informed of their obligation to leave the office space until they are able to return in accordance with established health standards. Individuals who receive a positive COVID-19 result are informed that they must notify their employer according to the instructions received from the Public Health Agency. For staff members who present with symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, it is recommended that they get tested, as they will receive the results sooner than 14 days (the amount of days they will need to quarantine), and can resume work at the office space once they have the negative result and have been symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours. (See appendix A)

☐ If a staff member tests positive for COVID-19:

  • They must inform Lesley Bramhill, General Manager of PWM, immediately. The office space must then be closed and completely disinfected. 
  • PWM should consult with Santé Publique, who will investigate and determine whether those who have been in contact with the individual who tested positive may report to work or not. 
  • It is recommended, however, that PWM err on the side of caution and have all staff members who had contact with the infected individual within the last 48 hours be tested, and remain closed until they receive their results.
  • Those who receive negative test results may resume work at the office. Those who receive positive test results must quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and 48 hours without a fever. (See appendix A)
  • It is recommended to have a contingency plan for office work if this were to happen (e.g., working from home).

If a staff member lives with someone who presents with one of the symptoms listed above:

  • The individual with the symptom(s) should be tested. 
  • The staff member should remain home until the test results are in.  If they are negative, they may resume activities as usual.  
  • If the person they live with tests positive, the staff member must quarantine or get tested.  If they quarantine and no symptoms develop, they may resume activities after 14 days. If they get tested, and it is positive, they quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours.  If it is negative, they can resume activities but ONLY if they or the family member who tested positive are quarantined from each other and there are no shared spaces between them. 
  • If the person they live with ONLY has a runny nose and no other symptoms, no testing or quarantine is necessary.

All staff members are informed of the prevention measures implemented in the company to reduce and control the risks associated with COVID-19 along with the importance of complying with them.

Working from home should be prioritized when possible.

When 2 or more staff are working in the office, wherever possible, the physical distance of 2 metres is maintained from the start to the end of the work period and during breaks and meals. If a staff member is in a private office (by themselves), or if a staff member is sitting at a desk 2 metres away from other staff members, they may remove their masks. Masks are otherwise worn at all times. This includes when preparing food/coffee/tea, when going to the washroom, when entering a private office, when entering the creative space, when entering and leaving the shared office space, when interacting with another staff member, etc.

If only 1 staff member is working in the office, it is not necessary to wear a mask, except upon entering and exiting the office, and when going to the washroom.

Staff members are asked to supply their own masks. Masks are worn for a maximum of 4 hours. If a workday consists of 8 hours, individuals will have 2 masks to use for the day. 

When masks are not being worn, they should be removed completely from the face and placed in a secure, clean location. They should not be worn on the chin, or on the back of the head. (See Appendix B for instructions on how to properly put on a mask)

Water and soap or a hydro-alcoholic solution with an alcohol concentration of at least 60% is available in sensitive areas for hand washing (entrance, washroom, kitchen, creative space, office space).

One person at a time may work in each of the private offices. Another individual may work at the individual desk in the shared space, and one person may work at the white shared table. The desk under the hanging plants is not a shared desk and is only used by the Artistic & Administrative Associate.

A cleaning checklist is used and filled out on a daily basis to ensure that all areas, objects, and surfaces have been cleaned appropriately and at the right frequency.

If there are 2 or more staff in the office, frequently touched surfaces and common areas, e.g., door handles, taps, toilets, fridge handle, microwave, coffee machine, telephones, computer accessories, tables, etc. (all to be included on cleaning checklist) are disinfected every 4 hours of work (e.g., during lunch break and at the end of the day). Office staff do not need to leave the space during cleaning. Depending on the number of staff in the office, it is recommended to have a schedule in place (e.g., assign a different person to clean each day of the week). Cleaning time should be included during working hours and planned accordingly.

If there is only 1 staff member in the office, ONLY what they have touched is sanitized before they leave for the day (e.g., their desk, doorknobs, kitchen area, etc.).

Any common objects that are used frequently and could be possibly shared amongst staff are cleaned before and after each use (e.g. tables, chair backs, pens, photocopier, etc.).

Staff members bring their own paper, writing materials, and water bottle and do not share with others.

Staff members have their own cubby to store their personal belongings and do not share with others. For staff members with a private office, these items can be kept in their office. 

☐ Each staff member/guest has a designated hook at the front entrance to hang their coat and umbrella and to place their boots.

Each staff member uses their own cutlery and dishes (knife, fork, bowl, plate, coffee cup, etc.) and do not share with others. These are to be washed after use and stored in their cubby.

If necessary, signage (e.g., floor markings) is put in place to establish the minimum physical distance of 2 metres near high traffic areas such as the kitchen, by the photocopier, etc.

Whenever possible, the use of shared office equipment such as the photocopier is eliminated. When use of such equipment is unavoidable, hand hygiene and equipment wipe down is performed before and after use. A disinfectant is kept next to the photocopier.

Hand hygiene, respiratory etiquette, and physical distancing rules are posted throughout the space and followed (e.g., kitchen, washroom, entrance, creative space, shared office space, etc.).

Non-essential items (magazines, newspapers, and knick-knacks) are removed from common areas. It is recommended that the section of the shared office space with the couch be blocked off from use (with tape, signs, etc.). If this is not possible then the area is wiped down after every use (and added to the cleaning checklist).

The books located on the bookshelves should not be used unless absolutely necessary. As books cannot be properly sanitized, if a book IS used, it should be placed in a plastic bag with the date on it, then placed in a closed bin for 72 hours, then returned to the bookshelf.

Garbage is thrown out in the appropriate bins (paper towels in the bin by the kitchen sink and all other material in the garbage by the entrance).

Animals are permitted in the office as there is no indication that they transmit the virus to humans.

The kitchen/dining area is disinfected every four hours (during lunch break and at the end of the day). This includes any surface area that may have been touched (counters, table, microwave, kettle, coffee maker, sink, faucet, paper towel dispenser, fridge door handles, etc.).

As face coverings cannot be worn during eating, adequate eating space (minimum of 2 metres) is provided to ensure physical distancing can be maintained as well as while waiting for food to be prepared (e.g., when using microwave).

Hand washing facilities and/or hand sanitizer is readily accessible in the kitchen/eating area and is used when entering and leaving the area.

Staff members use their own dishes and wash and dry them immediately after use. Dishes are washed with dish soap and water with a sponge and then dried with either paper towel or a drying towel. If a drying towel is used, it should be washed daily. Dishes are then stored in the staff member’s individual cubby. The drying rack is removed from the counter.

All eating surfaces are cleaned and disinfected before and after use.

Staff members are discouraged from leaving the job site to obtain food during the course of the workday, whenever possible, however it is not prohibited. If an individual leaves they should follow the guidelines put into place by the government.

Food and beverages are not shared amongst staff members.

Microwave: The handle of the microwave as well as the buttons are wiped down both BEFORE and AFTER use. A mask is worn when using the microwave. Sanitizer (a container of wipes or spray and paper towels) is kept next to the microwave at all times, as well as a sign with instructions.

Coffee maker: The individual making the coffee sanitizes their hands before preparing the coffee. The buttons and the handle of the coffee maker are wiped BEFORE and AFTER use. When preparing or pouring the coffee, a mask is worn (even if a distance of 2 metres is being maintained, or they are the only individual in the room). Sanitizer (a container of wipes or spray and paper towels) is kept next to the coffee maker at all times as well as a sign with instructions.

Kettle: The individual using the kettle sanitizes their hands before its use. The buttons and the handle of the kettle are wiped BEFORE and AFTER use. When filling the kettle with water, or pouring water from the kettle, a mask is worn (even if a distance of 2 metres is being maintained, or they are the only individual in the room). Sanitizer (a container of wipes or spray and paper towels) is kept next to the coffee maker at all times as well as a sign with instructions.

Fridge: The handle of the fridge is wiped down both BEFORE and AFTER use and a mask is worn while using the fridge. Individual’s food is kept in containers or bags and does not touch anyone else’s food. Food not used is removed/brought home at the end of the day.

Staff members disinfect their hands before and after use of the washroom, and minimize the amount of surface area that they touch.

When using the washroom, hands are washed before taking the washroom key from the hook in the shared office. 

A mask is worn on the way to the washroom, in the washroom, and returning from the washroom.

Though the washrooms have two stalls, only one person at a time may use the washroom. The individual using the washroom indicates the washroom is in use using the system provided.

Washrooms are disinfected after each use. This includes wiping any surface area that was touched (e.g., top of toilet seat, toilet handle or flusher, faucet handles, hand dryer/paper towel dispenser, door knob on inside and outside of washroom. Disinfecting wipes or spray are kept in the washroom for this purpose.

Upon return from the washroom, the staff member disinfects the key, places it back on the hook, and then disinfects their hands. Adequate supplies of soap, hand sanitizer, paper towels, and toilet tissue are maintained.

This policy is for PWM staff and individual artists, volunteers, or contractors who are using the PWM creative studio for artistic activities that require gathering in person.

Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal (PWM) validates with all individuals coming into the creative space their state of health and that they have none of the following symptoms. All individuals will fill out a form OR sign-in sheet verifying this information before each workday. This is done digitally or on paper. This information is confidential.

  • Fever (over 38 degrees Celsius)
  • New or worsening cough 
  • Difficulty breathing/shortness of breath
  • Sudden loss of smell or taste
  • Gastric symptoms i.e., diarrhea, nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle aches, fatigue, headache, chills, sore throat

Also check for the following:

  • Have they travelled outside of Canada within the past 14 days?
  • Have they had contact with someone with a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19 or someone who has just travelled outside of Canada within the last 14 days?

A no touch thermometer is used when an individual enters the creative space to ensure that they do not have a fever. 

Anyone who answers yes to any of the above (or displays a fever on the no touch thermometer) is informed of their obligation to leave the creative space until they are able to return in accordance with established health standards. Individuals who receive a positive COVID-19 result are informed that they must notify PWM according to the instructions received from the Public Health Agency. For individuals who present with symptoms or have been exposed, it is recommended that they get tested, as they will receive the results sooner than 14 days (the amount of days they will need to quarantine), and can resume activities in the creative space once they have the negative result and have been symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours. (See appendix A)

If an individual using the creative space tests positive for COVID-19:

  • They must inform Lesley Bramhill, General Manager of PWM, immediately. The creative space AND office space (due to having to go through the office to get to the creative space) must then be closed and completely disinfected. 
  • PWM should consult with Santé Publique, who will investigate and determine whether those who have been in contact with the individual who tested positive may report to work or not. 
  • It is recommended, however, that PWM err on the side of caution and have all individuals who had contact with the infected individual within the last 48 hours be tested, and remain closed until they receive their results.
  • Those who receive negative test results may resume activities in the creative space. Those who receive positive test results must quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and 48 hours without a fever. (See appendix A)

If an individual using the creative space lives with someone who presents with one of the symptoms listed above:

  • The individual with the symptom should be tested. 
  • The individual using the creative space should remain home until the test results are in.  If they are negative, they may resume activities as usual.  
  • If the person they live with tests positive, the individual using the creative space must quarantine or get tested.  If they quarantine and no symptoms develop, they may resume activities after 14 days. If they get tested, and it is positive, they quarantine for 14 days AND until they are symptom free for 24 hours and no fever for 48 hours.  If it is negative, they can resume activities but ONLY if they or the person they live with who tested positive are quarantined from each other and there are no shared spaces between them. 
  • If the person they live with ONLY has a runny nose and no other symptoms, no testing or quarantine is necessary.

All individuals entering the creative space have been informed of the prevention measures implemented in the company to reduce and control the risks associated with COVID-19 along with the importance of complying with them.

If possible, workshops are held in a digital/online format. Prior to an in-person workshop, a survey is sent to artists, facilitators, partners, and collaborators to assess both the creative needs and individual boundaries, comfort, and risk level. PWM will consider the needs of the artistic work and whether gathering is necessary and essential in order to move the creation process forward. Based on the answers from the survey and the needs of the artistic work, the PWM dramaturg will decide if the activity will take place: 

  • in person;
  • in a digital format; or
  • in a hybrid version of in-person and digital formats.

In the creative space, wherever possible, the physical distance of 2 metres is maintained from the start to the end of the work period and during breaks and meals. If ONLY table work is being done, and all individuals involved are able to maintain a distance of at least 2 metres, masks can be taken off once everyone is sitting down. Masks are worn at all other times. This includes when individuals get up from the table, are doing any movement work, going into the office space, into the kitchen, or to the washroom. Masks are always worn upon entering the creative space, leaving the creative space, and during breaks.

Individuals using the creative space are asked to supply their own masks. Masks are worn for a maximum of 4 hours. If a workday consists of 8 hours, individuals have 2 masks to use for the day.

When masks are not being worn, they should be removed completely from the face and placed in a secure, clean location. They should not be worn on the chin or on the back of the head. (See Appendix B for instructions on how to properly put on a mask)

Each individual using the creative space is given their own personal basket in which to store their personal belongings for the duration of their time in the creative space. Individuals bring their own coffee mug, water bottle, pen, paper, highlighter, and any other material they might need. These items should not be shared with others. It is the responsibility of that individual to disinfect these items at the end of the day. 

☐ Each individual using the creative space is designated a hook at the front entrance to hang their coat and umbrella and to place their boots.

☐ Scripts and other printouts are not shared amongst individuals. One copy for each individual is printed out or is e-mailed to the individual to print out or read on iPad, tablet, or e-reader.

The number of people in the creative space is reduced so as to allow the minimum distance of 2 metres between people to be respected. As the creative space has a square footage of 929 sq.ft., ideally a maximum of 8-12 people should be in the space at any given time, depending on the configuration of the tables, and whether there is movement required.

Physical contact is avoided, including shaking hands, “high-fives,” fist or elbow bumps, or hugging. 

When possible, stagger start and call times to limit the number of individuals in the creative space at any one time.

Non-essential visitors to the space are restricted. If visitors are provided access, they are subject to the same guidance as staff members and those using the creative space, including the need for symptom screening and PPE requirements.

Water and soap or a hydro-alcoholic solution with an alcohol concentration of at least 60% is available in sensitive areas for hand washing (entrance, washroom, kitchen, creative space, office space).

Limit as much as possible the amount of props, objects, and set pieces used in the creative space. If props are to be shared, individuals disinfect their hands before AND after use, and the prop should be wiped down immediately after its shared use. If it is possible to wipe it down between being passed from one person to the next, this is done.

Any equipment (microphones, headsets, technical equipment), props, instruments, and set pieces that will be used in the creative space are cleaned and disinfected before and after use. It is recommended to identify who is responsible for this and to include it on the cleaning checklist.

Individuals who handle sets, equipment, objects, or props during a rehearsal frequently wash their hands. 

Individuals using the creative space can use the kitchen in order to make coffee and must follow the guidelines mentioned above when doing so. Individuals are asked to bring their own water bottle, lunch, and snacks and to keep these things in their own personal containers/lunchboxes. Garbage should be thrown out in the appropriate bins (paper towels in the bin by the kitchen sink and all other material in the garbage by the entrance).

This policy is for PWM staff and individual artists, volunteers, or contractors who are using the PWM creative studio for artistic activities that require gathering in person for livestreaming or performances.

During livestreaming performances, individuals do not need to wear a mask IF the blocking maintains a minimum distance of 2 metres between ALL cast members and there is no physical contact. Physical contact or close proximity (less than 2 metres) may be allowed if all other safety precautions have been met AND the actors wear a mask.

Any equipment (microphones, headsets, technical equipment), props, instruments, and set pieces that will be used during livestream performance are cleaned and disinfected before and after use. It is recommended to identify who is responsible for this and to include it on the cleaning checklist.

Individuals who handle sets, equipment, objects, or props during a performance frequently wash their hands.

Limit as much as possible the amount of props, objects, and set pieces used during livestream performances. If props are to be shared, individuals should disinfect their hands before AND after use, and the prop should be wiped down immediately after its shared use. If it is possible to wipe it down between being passed from one person to the next, this should be done.

Each actor should have their own makeup kit.

Personal equipment (such as tools, headsets, microphones, and radios) shall be cleaned both before AND after being issued.

If possible, equipment such as radios/walkie-talkies/headsets shall be issued to a single individual and used exclusively by that person for the duration of production. If equipment must be shared between individuals, the item shall be wiped down before and after use, and hand hygiene shall be performed after handling.

When possible, stagger start and call times to limit the number of individuals in the creative space at any one time.

New clothes are washed or left aside for a minimum of 3 hours before a fitting. Clothes or costumes that have been tried on are set aside and washed or steamed or left for a minimum of 3 hours before being tried on by another artist or made available to the production.

Fittings are done in isolated spaces and with one cast member at a time. 

The cast member being fitted as well as the costume designer disinfect their hands both before and after the fitting.

Costume designers or anyone who handles the clothes or costumes wash their hands frequently. 

Clothes or costumes are kept in individual plastic covers or brought home by each individual at the end of every rehearsal or performance.

Clothes or costumes worn are washed with the usual laundry soap or dry-cleaned. (See “Linens, clothing, and laundry items” section for more details) A mask AND eye protection (goggles or a visor covering the face up to the chin) are provided to the costume designer (or anyone handling costumes) when completing a task that requires being within 2 metres of another person (e.g., measurements, fittings, etc.).

SITES INTERNET

  1. INSTRUCTIONS FOR PEOPLE WHO HAVE SYMPTOMS
    OR HAVE BEEN IN CONTACT WITH A CONFIRMED CASE OF COVID-19

You must either

  • Get tested for COVID-19. 

This is the recommended course of action because the individual will receive the results within a matter of days. If the results are negative, they can resume normal activities.

OR

  • Quarantine for 14 days. 
    • If you do not develop symptoms, you can end your quarantine 14 days after your last contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19.
    • If you do develop symptoms, you can end your isolation 14 days after the onset of your symptoms and:
      • You have had no fever for 48 hours without using fever medicine.
      • You have had no symptoms for at least 24 hours except for cough and loss of smell, which may last longer. These recommendations are mandatory even if you test negative for COVID-19 prior to the end of the 14 days, because you can develop the infection up to 14 days from the contact.
  1. YOU HAVE BEEN TESTED FOR COVID-19

You tested positive

You can end your period of isolation 14 days after the onset of your symptoms and:

  • You have had no fever for at least 48 hours without using fever medicine.
  • You have had no acute symptoms for at least 24 hours except for cough and loss of smell, which can last longer.
  • A second test may be recommended to confirm that you no longer have COVID-19.

You tested negative

A second test may be recommended to confirm that you do not have COVID-19. If a second test is not necessary or is negative, you can end your period of isolation 24 hours after the end of your symptoms and 48 hours without a fever.

https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/b/1/csm_20-210-64W_laver-les-mains_ef83e7854e.png?0Wash your hands before use of the face covering, also called handcrafted mask.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/a/a/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_etape-fixez-derriere-oreilles_8013421ea7.png?0With one hand, place the face covering over your nose and mouth. Use your other hand to attach it behind your ears with the elastic or string loops.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/0/a/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_etape-ajustez-nez_424cbec29e.png?0Adjust the face covering to your nose.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/7/4/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_etape-ajustez-menton_dbf5f60885.png?0Now adjust it under your chin.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/b/1/csm_20-210-64W_laver-les-mains_ef83e7854e.png?0Wash your hands after use of the face covering.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/5/7/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_humide_bdf177c693.png?0Change your face covering if it becomes moist, soiled or damaged.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/6/b/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_sur-le-cou_7168cc7b47.png?0Do not leave the face covering hanging from your neck or an ear. Keep it on your face and avoid touching it. If you do touch your face covering while wearing it, wash your hands thoroughly as soon as possible.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/e/2/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_retirer_b6ce064121.png?0Remove your face covering by the elastic or string loops without touching the front.
https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/_processed_/6/6/csm_20-210-64W_couvre-visage_laver_1b3fb8642b.png?0Fold the outer parts of the face covering together and place it in a clean bag. You may wash the face covering as soon as you get home, along with the rest of the laundry.

WARNING – FACE COVERING DOES NOT REPLACE THE FOLLOWING:

  • Hand washing
  • Physical distancing (2 metres)
  • Isolation at home if you are sick

GENERAL

  • For general cleaning (wiping down kitchen, washroom, tables, door knobs, etc.), a spray solution (containing alcohol or bleach) may be used (along with paper towel). A store-bought product can be used, or a bleach solution can be made with the following ratio: 4 cups of water (1 litre) to 2 teaspoons of bleach. Bleach solutions are effective for disinfection for up to 24 hours, so should be discarded and re-made on a daily basis. Use water at room temperature for dilution. Label diluted cleaning solutions.
  • Disinfecting wipes may also be used for general cleaning. (See electronics section for recommendations)
  • Wear disposable gloves when cleaning and disinfecting surfaces. Gloves should be discarded after each cleaning. If reusable gloves are used, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other purposes. 
  • Wash or disinfect hands both before and after the use of gloves.
  • If surfaces are dirty, they are cleaned using a detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

ELECTRONICS

  • Turn off the equipment, unplug the power cord from the wall or power strip, and remove the battery from portable or wireless keyboards and mice before the cleaning process.
  • Do not use disinfectant wipes containing bleach, disinfectant sprays, aerosol sprays or anything abrasive.
  • Do not use an extremely damp disinfectant wipe to clean the area. If you encounter a very damp wipe it may need to be squeezed to remove the excess liquid before use.
  • Do not allow the liquid from the disinfectant wipe to sit or pool on the area being disinfected for a long amount of time.
  • Do not use rough towels or cloths to dry the area.
  • Do not use excess force when disinfecting the area around the keyboard; this could damage the keys.
  • Use a disinfectant wipe to wipe the area first, then use a damp, soft, lint-free cloth, and finally dry the area with another soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Suggested products (the following products are safe to use on electronics and can also be used to wipe down frequently touched surfaces, the washroom, kitchen, etc.):

LINENS, CLOTHING AND LAUNDRY ITEMS:

Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry and then discard after each use. 

If using reusable gloves, those gloves are dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and are not used for other purposes. Disinfect hands before and after the use of gloves.

If possible, do not shake dirty laundry. This will minimize the possibility of dispersing the virus through the air.

Launder items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items. Clean and disinfect clothes hampers regularly. If possible, consider placing a bag liner that is either disposable (can be thrown away) or can be laundered.

Those procedures were developed in August 2020 by Lindsay Petts, M.A.
You can download a printable version of our procedures here.

Any question? Call Lindsay Petts at 514-880-8708.