Introducing the Cole Foundation Mentorship Emerging Translators

Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal et le The Cole Foundation are thrilled to announce the participants to this year’s Mentorat pour traductrices et traducteurs émergents de la Fondation Cole, Rhiannon Collett and Elaine Normandeau.

THE ARTISTS

Rhiannon Collett

Headshot of Rhiannon Collett
Photo credit: Yuula Benivolski

Rhiannon Collett (they/them) is an award-winning non-binary playwright, performer, director and translator based in Montreal and Toronto. Their work explores the ritualization of grief, gender performativity, queer/trans identity and the psychological effects of sexual objectification.

Selected playwriting credits include Miranda & Dave Begin Again / Miranda et Dave recommencent encore (2016 Playwrights Guild of Canada RBC Emerging Playwright Award, presented in French at the 2019 Festival du Jamais Lu, and the 2020 Festival les Petites Formes, Martinique); Wasp (commissioned by Nightswimming, presented at the 2019 Rhubarb Festival, and developed at the Stratford Festival Lab), The Kissing Game (commissioned by Youtheatre and Young People’s Theatre, developed at the 2018 Banff Playwrights Lab, produced by Youtheatre, awarded the META for Outstanding New Text 2019); Tragic Queens (commissioned and devised with CABAL Theatre/Wildside Festival 2018); There Are No Rats in Alberta (created as a part of the 2017-18 Buddies in Bad Times Emerging Creators Unit, presented at the Rhubarb Festival 2018 ), and the English language translation of Chienne(s) by Marie-Eve Milot and Marie-Claude St-Laurent (in development with BoucheWHACKED! Theatre Collective). Rhiannon’s work is funded by the Toronto
Arts Council, the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

Rhiannon was a guest artist at the LungA festival in Seyðisfjörður, Iceland and artist-in-residence at the Mauser Eco House in Costa Rica. They are a graduate of Generator’s Performance Criticism Training Program, Buddies in Bad Times Emerging Creators Unit, Playwrights’ Workshop Montreal’s Young Creators Unit and Black Theatre Workshop’s Artist Mentorship Program.

Rhiannon is a settler in Toronto, on the traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, the Huron-Wendat and the Haudenosaunee peoples, and in Tiohtià:ke (Montreal), on the traditional, un-ceded territory of the Kanien’kehá:ka people.

Play in translation: Ces regards amoureux de garçons altérés by Éric Noël

Elaine Normandeau

Headshot of Elaine Normandeau
Photo credit: John Lederman

For 25 years, after studying law and then theater, Elaine Normandeau has worked as an assistant director and stage manager in French and English theatre.

During these years, she had the privilege of working on landmark productions such as Le Procès et Siegfried by Wagner directed by François Girard, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest et Le misanthrope directed by Michel Monty, Belles-Soeurs directed by René Richard Cyr, Intérieur et Au coeur de la rose directed by Denis Marleau, Variations énigmatiquesUn fil à la patte et Equus directed by Daniel Roussel,  Une musique inquiétante/Old Wicked Songs directed by Martin Faucher, Waiting for the Barbarians et Amadeus directed by Alexandre Marine and Top Girls directed by Micheline Chevrier. In 2017, Elaine Normandeau participated as linguistic director in the film  Hochelaga, terre des âmes by François Girard, immersed in Mohawk and Anishnaabe cultures. She also works as a translator and creates surtitles for the theatre.

Play in translation: Muliats by Charles Bender, Charles Buckell, Marco Collin, Xavier Huard, Natasha Kanapé Fontaine et Christophe Payeur (le collectif)

LE PROGRAMME

The translation of new work for the stage is a core part of our programming. Since its inception in 2013, the Mentorat pour traductrices et traducteurs émergents de la Fondation Cole (formerly Cole Competition for Emerging Translators) has been guiding the next generation of translators from French into English. 

With the expert guidance of acclaimed translator Maureen Labonté and in partnership with the Fondation Cole, PWM has built a program that mentors emerging translators through every stage of the process. The successful candidate receives a $1,000 honorarium and an eight-month mentorship with Maureen Labonté which includes a workshop with actors and a public reading.

Plus de détails sur le programme disponibles ici.

Ce programme est un partenariat entre
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INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE TRANSLATION 2020

A one-on-one mentorship opportunity

For years Playwrights’ Workshop Montreal (PWM) and the Centre des auteurs dramatiques (CEAD) have worked to forge links between French and English language theatre communities and foster the art of theatre translation. To this end, the two organizations have once again partnered together to offer two individualized mentorships meant to familiarize playwrights to the craft of theatre translation. The mentorship described below is focused on French to English theatre translation. Details on the English to French translation component of this mentorship can be found on the CEAD’s website.

How the mentorship works:

  • PWM will select 1 participant with an interest in French to English theatre translation;
  • Over a period of several months, the participant will translate excerpts (roughly 10-12 pages) of two contemporary Québécois plays selected by the CEAD;
  • Over several weeks, the participant will receive a total of 12 hours of dramaturgical support from acclaimed playwright and theatre translator Alexis Diamond;
  • The participant will have the opportunity to discuss their translations with the original playwrights;
  • The mentorship will culminate in two 4-hour workshops during which professional actors will read and discuss the newly-translated excerpts;
  • The participant will then have the chance to meet with the second participant as well as both mentors to present their work and discuss their experiences;
  • After the workshops, the participant will submit their final drafts of the translated excerpts to the CEAD.

Who can apply?

  • Montreal-based playwrights with a strong interest in French-to-English theatre translation;
  • The candidate must have excellent writing skills in English and have fluent comprehension of Québecois French;
  • Playwrights with little to no experience in theatre translation are encouraged to apply;
  • Applicants must have a minimum of two professionally produced pieces or Fringe productions. 

Application Guidelines

Send your application, documents, as well as any questions you may have to Harris Frost at harris@playwrights.ca.

The deadline to apply is Monday, October 26th at noon.

Please include the following attachments (preferably as PDFs) in your application email:

  1. Your artistic CV and/or bio;
  2. A brief cover letter outlining your interest in this mentorship and in French-to-English theatre translation more generally.


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

October 26th
Application deadline.

November 4th
Participant selected and provided with excerpts.

November – March
Several meetings with translation mentor, translation of excerpts and meetings with playwrights.

Before March 6th
2x 4-hour workshops of translated excerpts and final meeting with other participant.

Biography of Alexis Diamond


Alexis Diamond is a Montreal-based playwright, opera librettist, translator and theatre curator. Her award-winning plays, operas and translations for audiences of all ages have been presented across Canada, in the U.S. and in Europe. She also collaborates with several international artists on performance-installations involving text, movement and sound. In 2019, Alexis Diamond served as co-artistic director of the Jamais Lu festival, where she also presented a bilingual play, Faux-amis, with co-author Hubert Lemire, with support from the CALQ. In 2018, Alexis joined a multiyear project led by professor Erin Hurley (McGill University) on the history of Quebec’s English-language theatre.

This mentorship is made possible by:

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2020 COLE FOUNDATION MENTORSHIP FOR EMERGING TRANSLATORS

Deadline extended to October 18!

The translation of new work for the stage is a core part of Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal’s (PWM) programming. Since its inception in 2013, the Mentorat pour traductrices et traducteurs émergents de la Fondation Cole (formerly Cole Competition for Emerging Translators) has been guiding the next generation of translators from French into English. 

With the expert guidance of acclaimed translator Maureen Labonté and in partnership with the Fondation Cole, PWM has built a program that mentors emerging translators through every stage of the process. The successful applicant to this year’s mentorship program will receive a $1,000 honorarium and an eight-month mentorship with Maureen Labonté which includes a workshop with actors and a public reading.

WHO CAN APPLY?

To be eligible, emerging translators must have completed at least one translation which has received a public reading, publication or production. Because the focus is on developing translators, the applicant must not have done more than three translations. 

WITH WHAT PLAY(S)?

Before applying for the Mentorship, emerging translators must choose the play they wish to translate and contact the playwright for permission: Establishing a connection to the play and the playwright in advance means that the applicant is already invested in the proposed work and would be in a position to begin work immediately following the announcement of the selected project.

Translations must be from French into English only. 

Full-length scripts, one acts or theatre for young people are all welcome. Please note, our expertise does not extend to the translation of musicals.

SOUTIEN FOURNI

The recipient of the program will receive $1000 honorarium, dramaturgical support from renowned translator, Maureen Labonté, and a translation workshop with actors.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Pour postuler, veuillez nous faire parvenir :

  • A one-page letter of intent describing the project, its challenges and your reasons for wanting to translate the work;
  • Your biography (maximum 250 words);
  • A copy of your chosen play;
  • Written permission from the original playwright of the play;
  • A 3 to 5 page sample of your previous translation work, please include the corresponding original text.

Send all the documents in one email to emma@playwrights.ca with the subject line “2020 Cole Foundation Mentorship for Emerging Translators – Application”. 

The deadline to submit applications is October 18, 2020 at 11:59PM. All applicants will be notified of the results.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

If you have any questions about the eligibility of your application or your project, do not hesitate to contact us. Please address questions to Emma Tibaldo, Executive and Artistic Director of Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal, at emma@playwrights.ca.

En partenariat avec

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Résidence de Traduction Glassco 2020

La Résidence de Traduction Glassco 2020 est organisée par Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal, en partenariat avec la Fondation Cole,et le soutien des amis et de la famille de Bill Glassco.

*MISE À JOUR COVID-19 – 16 JUIN 2020*
Après quatorze ans de programmation, nous avons pris la décision difficile de suspendre la résidence pour la saison 2020.

Après une analyse approfondie de la situation à Tadoussac, au Québec et partout au Canada, nous savons que c'est la bonne voie à suivre. Nous n'avons pas été en mesure de concevoir une résidence en personne tout en respectant les consignes de santé publique pour le rassemblement sous un même toit.

Nous avons pensé qu'il était important de maintenir l'intégrité de la résidence, centrée sur le rassemblement de dramaturges et de traducteurs en un même endroit pour approfondir la pratique de la traduction sur scène. Nous sommes impatients d'accueillir à nouveau les traducteurs et créateurs au Chalet Fletcher en juin 2021.

En lieu et place de la résidence de cette année, nous commençons à planifier une rétrospective virtuelle de la Résidence de Traduction Glassco qui accueillera les leçons apprises des anciens participants. Nous publierons plus de détails dans les prochains mois.

*MISE À JOUR COVID-19 – 26 Mars 2020*
Le niveau d'incertitude entourant le coronavirus et les restrictions de voyage nous empêchent de poursuivre le processus de sélection. Nous avons donc décidé que la mesure la plus responsable consiste à retarder la sélection jusqu'à ce que des données plus fiables soient disponibles.
Nous reviendrons fin avril avec plus de détails.


La Résidence de Traduction Glassco invite des auteurs dramatiques et des traducteurs de tout le Canada et d'ailleurs à se rendre ensemble à Tadoussac, Québec, pour travailler en profondeur leurs projets de traduction ou d’adaptation.

Les participants sélectionnés se voient ainsi offerts une occasion unique de se concentrer sur leurs projets et de partager leurs expertises dans une ambiance unique. Les traductions dans toutes langues sont les bienvenues. Au cours des quinze dernières années nous avons soutenu plus de 63 projets de traduction vers le cantonnais, le catalan, le crie, l'anglais, le français, l'innu aimun, l'italien, le portugais, l'espagnol, le tamoul, le tagolog, et l'urdu.

Cette saison, nous accueillerons la traductrice réputée Maryse Warda, qui assurera les rôles d'hôte de résidence et de conseillère dramaturgique.

Nous acceptons maintenant les projets de pièces prêtes à la traduction. Veuillez noter que nous ne finançons pas les traductions. Les pièces doivent, idéalement, avoir été produites dans leur version originale. Au moins un des éléments du projet doit être canadien. Nous encourageons grandement les artistes autochtones à soumettre leurs projets.

Pour postuler, veuillez nous faire parvenir :
  • Une description du projet incluant les noms du traducteur et de l’auteur, ainsi que les attendus de la résidence pour le projet, et toutes les informations relatives à une éventuelle production;
  • Biographies of both the playwright and translator;
  • Un exemplaire de la pièce dans sa langue originale.

Un des critères de sélection des projets est la possibilité pour l’auteur et son traducteur de participer ensemble, en même temps, à la résidence.

Chaque participant recevra un honoraire de 750 $. De plus, tous les frais de voyage, de repas et d’hébergement sont couverts.

Submission deadline: March 2nd, 2020

Veuillez soumettre vos projets par courriel (Format PDF, 1 fichier seulement) à residency@playwrights.ca avec le sujet : Candidature à la résidence de Traduction Glassco 2020.

Pour toute question, veuillez communiquer avec Emma Tibaldo à emma@playwrights.ca.

Plus d'information sur la Résidence de Traduction Glassco ici.

Accessibilité : 

La résidence a lieu dans une maison en bois rond du 18e siècle, à Tadoussac, au Québec. Un escalier de 8 marches mène à l’entrée de la maison. Les salles de bain ne sont pas accessibles aux fauteuils roulants.


La Résidence de traduction Glassco à Tadoussac est rendue possible grâce à notre partenariat avec le Programme de Conversations Interculturelles de la Fondation Cole, au dévouement de la productrice de la résidence Briony Glassco, ainsi qu'aux donations à la mémoire du grand artiste théâtral canadien Bill Glassco. Nous sommes également reconnaissants envers le Conseil des arts du Canada, le Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec et le Conseil des arts de Montréal pour leur soutien continu.

Supporters: The Cole Foundation, Friends and Family of Bill Glassco, The Canada Council for the Arts, Le Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Le Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec

Apply Now: Theatre Translation Workshop with Frank Heibert

Lire cette annonce en français

Dates: September 23, 24 & 25 (3-day workshop)
Heure : 9:30 AM – 5 PM (Including a lunch break) 
Lieu : PWM, 7250 Clark #103, Montréal, QC. 
Fee: $90

Presented in collaboration with Le Centre des auteurs dramatiques (CEAD), this 3-day workshop is led by prolific German theatre translator Frank Heibert. The workshop, which will include group discussions, theoretical lectures and translation exercises built around specific case studies, is aimed at emerging to mid-career theatre translators.

Guiding questions will include:

  • How do you find your characters’ voices?
  • What are similarities and differences between translation and adaptation?
  • In cases where a translation is commissioned for a specific production, should the translator’s vision take priority over the director’s vision?

The practice of working off of a word-for-word translation in collaboration with a translator fluent in the source language will also be discussed.

Participants are encouraged to bring in a translation project in progress. However, translators not currently working on a project are also encouraged to apply. The target language of these projects can be French or English, and the source language should ideally be one of the following languages: German, English, Spanish, French, Italian or Portuguese. Participants’ projects will be discussed in detail and will help to determine the topics of the workshop.

The workshop will be led in English and French, depending on the needs and fluency of the participants.

Application guidelines:

  • Send applications to harris@playwrights.ca with the subject line Exploring Practice with Frank Heibert.
  • Please attach the following three documents:
    • The translation project that you plan on discussing during the workshop: please attach roughly 10 pages of both your translation and the original script as well as a brief synopsis of the piece. (Excerpts of the translation are not mandatory, but applications containing excerpts will be prioritized.)
    • A letter of intention (1 page maximum).
    • An up-to-date CV.
  • Application deadline: 11 AM on June 28, 2019

About the Instructor:

Frank Heibert lives in Berlin and has studied literature in Germany, Italy, and France. Since 1983, he has worked as a translator of literature from English, French, Italian and Portuguese into German. From 1990-1995, he was the co-publisher of his own small publishing house Zebra Literaturverlag. He has also worked as an editor, a speaker,  a critic and a professor at Free University of Berlin. He is a member of PEN International, the worldwide writers’ association and is the winner of numerous literary awards for writing and translation.

He has translated over 95 novels and story collections by, among many others, Don DeLillo, Richard Ford, William Faulkner, Boris Vian, Alfred Jarry, Marie Darrieussecq, Yasmina Reza, and Raymond Queneau. He has also translated roughly 110 plays, by playwrights such as Tony Kushner, Neil LaBute, Nicky Silver, George F. Walker, Jonathan Garfinkel, Terrence McNally, Martin Crimp, Yasmina Reza, Italo Svevo, and Lina Wertmüller as well as Quebec playwrights Michel Marc Bouchard, Suzanne Lebeau, and Olivier Kemeid.

 

PRESENTED IN COLLABORATION WITH:

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THIS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITY IS MADE POSSIBLE BY:

Emploi-Québec and Compétence Culture Logos

 

Looking Back at the 2018 Glassco Translation Residency in Tadoussac

By Bobby Theodore
Translation dramaturg and host of the Glassco Translation Residency

 Cliquez ici pour lire la version française

Much like the bees in the burgeoning flower garden outside Fletcher Cottage, this year’s residency featured a tremendous amount of cross-pollination as we welcomed playwrights and translators from Innu, Queer Pakistani-Canadian Muslim, Tamil Canadian, French-speaking Quebecois, English-speaking Quebecois, and Argentinian communities. The plays in translation dealt with the aftermath of the Sri Lankan Civil War, the perversion of contemporary art by corporate interests, the intersection of queerness and Islamic identity, and how to talk about life to toddlers. Conversations are always inspiring and exciting in Tadoussac, but there was an essential shift this year that provoked new exchanges which will likely reverberate for years to come.

Innu translator Joséphine Bacon kicked off the residency with a deeply moving, in-depth acknowledgment of the unceded land that Fletcher Cottage was built upon. It was a true gift to hear her speak about Tadoussac, her Nation, and its historical ties to the Saguenay and North Shore. She came to Tadoussac to work on residency veteran Jasmine Dubé’s Marguerite. Marguerite is a choral play which tells the entire life story of one woman, from her birth until her death. A poetic piece that flows like a river, Jasmine set out to write this play after she was inspired to create theatre for toddlers. With Marguerite, she shares her love of language and playfulness through straightforward and evocative storytelling. After performing this work in French for 10 years, Jasmine decided she wanted to try and tour it to smaller communities in Northern Quebec. After she approached Joséphine about translating the play, they both agreed it would be a wonderful opportunity for the Innu-aimun language to be reinforced and for toddlers (and even their parents) to learn the language through a theatrical experience, surrounded by other babies and their parents. The main challenge Joséphine faced was that Innu-aimun has far fewer words than French. So, on occasion, she needed to use several words to describe one French word when there was no Innu-aimun equivalent. It was wonderful to see Jasmine and Joséphine forge a deep bond at the Residency, even though they’d never met before. Jasmine took advantage of Joséphine’s presence to advance her soon-to-be produced play for adults (a first!) Lascaux, even cutting out a central part of story she felt she’d appropriated from an indigenous myth.

First-time resident Alexis Martin came to Tadoussac to work with playwright Michael Mackenzie on a translation of Art Object, Michael’s sequel to Instructions for a Socialist Government Looking to Abolish Christmas, also translated by Alexis. Art Object, slated to premiere at Théâtre d’Aujourd’hui in 2020, is a play that satirises the often amoral and complex relationship between high art and high finance. In his translation of the play, Alexis drew upon his prior knowledge of Michael’s characters and universe, as well as his acting experience. During the residency, Alexis spoke about his need to find the “breath” inside each translation he works on. Until he finds its breath, until the text is playable, he isn’t satisfied with his work. He uses a more liberal and creative approach to theatre translation, something he executes with Michael’s enthusiastic blessing. Each day, the two old friends and collaborators would go for long hikes during which Alexis would ask all the questions he’d accumulate over his morning work session. Later in the residency, when Argentinian translator Jaime Arrambide arrived to work on his Latin American Spanish version Michael’s Instructions to Any Future Government Wishing to Abolish Christmas, all three artists exchanged tactics and ideas to improve the translations. During the residency, Jaime fell in love with Art Object and now feels compelled to translate that play too. Jaime spoke to us about the vibrant theatre scene in Buenos Aires as well as the challenges of getting translated work staged there. While both Alexis and Jaime were working on their translations, Michael advanced his numerous writing projects.

Dushy Gnanapragasam came to translate Suvendrini Lena’s play The Enchanted Loom into Tamil. The Enchanted Loom is a haunting drama about a Tamil Canadian family dealing with trauma in the aftermath of the Sri Lankan civil war. The multiple levels of language in the play presented a big challenge for Dushy since Suvendrini’s writing is equally poetic, lyrical, and medical, with Tamil influences. This team had been working on this translation for the past 3 years but the Residency was the first time they were able to spend dedicated time to the process. While working with Dushy in Tadoussac, Suvendrini discovered there were elements of the play, her first script, which she wanted to rewrite or cut. This often happens in Tadoussac as the translation process provides a means to improve upon original work through the lens of translation. Once they completed the Tamil version, Suvendrini and Dushy worked day and night on a new bilingual (Tamil/English) version of the play, rushing to get it done before they returned to their busy lives. During her stay at Fletcher Cottage, Suvendrini often repeated how this was the version of the play she’d “always dreamed of” creating. Though The Enchanted Loom will premiere in Toronto in Tamil in the next year or so, it’s often difficult to find the means and time to translate theatre for communities that aren’t part of the so-called dominant culture. During our late-afternoon discussions, we spoke about looking beyond English – French translation in this country in order to address the needs of the many communities who want to hear and see themselves on stage.

This year Olivier Sylvestre returned to Tadoussac as a translator to work with Bilal Baig on his play Acha Bacha. Bilal wrote Acha Bacha to speak specifically to Queer Muslim Pakistanis, so translating this play into French for a Quebecois audience posed several challenges. Acha Bacha is about a Queer Muslim Pakistani living in Mississauga (a large suburb of Toronto) who’s haunted by a traumatic memory the day before his lover leaves on a pilgrimage to the Middle East. Olivier thought about transposing this story to Montreal but expressed his concerns about this choice. His inquiry created an opportunity for some wonderful and lively discussion during our end-of-day meetings. How does a Queer Muslim Pakistani Canadian speak in French? Do they just sound Quebecois using, as Olivier put it, “ma langue”? Olivier explained how there aren’t many French-language Quebecois plays set in South Asian communities, let alone about the Queer Muslim Pakistani experience – which is what inspired him to translate this play. After listening to the group’s advice and his gut, Olivier decided to keep the play in Toronto as well as all the Urdu that’s spoken in the play. Olivier realized he needed to be sensitive to Bilal’s intentions and not simply translate the play to make it palatable for a French-speaking Québecois audience. He had to find a way maintain cultural specificity while keeping his audience engaged with material that may be unfamiliar to them. No small feat. By the end of the residency, Bilal seemed incredibly honored to have gone through this process and trusted that his first play was in Olivier’s expert hands – a clear result of their sustained proximity at Fletcher Cottage.

Like every year, it’s challenging to summarize everything that happened during this year’s residency. There are intangibles: the increased confidence residents gain over their time at the residency; the new creative relationships that are made; the validation they all feel; the significant moments of creative birth/rebirth… There were also bracing noon swims (in honor of Bill who swam every day), a trip to Cap de Bon Désir with no whales in sight, spicy debates about cultural appropriation, and – depending on which room you walked into – a constant stream of Tamil, Innu-aimun, French, Spanish, Urdu, or English. As always, Briony Glassco’s welcoming and joyous presence helped set the positive tone of our wonderful 10-day stay at her family’s magical home.

(L to R) Michael Mackenzie, Dushy Gnanapragasam, Bilal Baig, Jasmine Dubé, Joséphine Bacon, Suvendrini Lena, Alexis Martin, and Olivier Sylvestre (Not pictured: Jaime Arrambide)

PWM would like to thank the Cole Foundation and the Friends & Family of Bill Glassco for making this residency possible.