Structure (for Writers who Hate Structure)

Exploring Practice with Eric Micha Holmes

Dates: March 18, 20 & 22, 2019
Time: 10AM to 3PM (15 hours total)
Location: PWM
Fee: $45 (Please contact us if this fee would be a barrier to your participation)
Application deadline: February 24, 2019

This three-day workshop is aimed at playwrights who have a project they want to revisit—or have been chronically stuck on.

Ideal applicants are emerging/mid-career writers who may be familiar with Aristotle, Freytag, and Joseph Campbell, but haven’t read them in a while—or have found them unhelpful because they work in non-traditional modes. This workshop can be used to manipulate the thinkers mentioned above toward the playwright’s own unique, innovative, and bold artistic goals. Participants will also have the opportunity to hear (small selections) of their work read out loud and discussed rigorously using the tools being developed in this workshop.

This workshop will include:

  1. Overview of dramatic structure drawing from an eclectic variety of sources from antiquity to the modern day
  2. Prompts that may include some light writing exercises to share
  3. In-depth discussion, argument, and practice

How to Register:

Send applications to: harris@playwrights.ca and emma@playwrights.ca.
Use subject line: Exploring Practice with Eric Micha Holmes
Deadline to Apply: February 24, 2019
Note: Please include your CV/Bio as well as brief paragraph explaining your interest in this training.

Biography:

Eric Micha Holmes is a playwright and radio dramatist whose work has been heard on the BBC (“Care Inc.”) and seen at The National Black Theatre (“Mondo Tragic,”) The New Black Fest and MCC Theatre (“Pornplay; or, Blessèd Are The Meek,”) and New York Theatre Workshop (“Nimpsey Pink.”). He’s a Dramatist Guild Fellow, Audible Award Recipient, and resident playwright of the National Black Theater.

His mono-play, “Walking Next To Michael Brown: Confessions Of A Tragic Mulatto,” was commissioned by The New Black Fest and has toured with Barrymore-Nominated “Hands Up: 7 Playwrights / 7 Testaments” to theatres across the country including:  The Brooklyn Museum Of Art, The Red Door Theatre, Crowded Fire Theatre, The Museum Of The Moving Image, The Hansberry Project, and Flashpoint Theatre.

Eric’s Website
Interview with Breaking Character Magazine 

 

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Seeking Participants: Interdisciplinary Dramaturgy Lab

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A five-day exploration of the art of dramaturgy across three disciplines

Dates: February 4-8, 2019  (Mon.-Fri.)
Times: 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 
Location: Studio 303 (372 Ste-Catherine West, Montreal, QC)
Participation fee: $80

This lab is open to creators, writers, choreographers, dramaturgs and interdisciplinary performance artists.

This 5-day laboratory is a gathering of dramaturgs from various disciplines to exchange best practices and fundamental aspects of live art. Led by Kathy Casey (dance), Dana Dugan (circus) and Sarah Elkashef (theatre), the lab is a space to exchange dramaturgical tools and challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective. It is an opportunity to acknowledge dramaturgy as an art form.

Application guideline: To apply for this training, please submit a bio, your CV, and a short (1-2 paragraph) statement explaining why this training interests you, how it is relevant to your artistic practice and what your expectations are for this lab.

Please send applications to emma@playwrights.ca and harris@playwrights.ca
Subject line: Interdisciplinary Dramaturgy Lab
Application deadline: January 21, 2019

Biographies:

Born in North Carolina, Kathy Casey began her dance career in 1979 with the Chicago Moving Company. Settled in New York in 1980, she danced for many choreographers before joining the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company in 1984. In 1989, she became a member of Susan Marshall & Company, with whom she had collaborated since 1981. From 1985-1989, she also assisted Mr. Lubovitch and Ms. Marshall in creation. Kathy Casey has danced in Europe, Asia, and North America and continues to give numerous workshops across Canada and the United States. Welcomed by Montréal Danse in 1991, she was appointed Artistic Director of the company in March 1996. A major portion of her work now is collaborating with choreographers on the dramaturgy of the works created for the company. In addition to her work with Montréal Danse, she also works as an artistic advisor with independent choreographers in the city.

Dana Dugan is an American circus artist, performer, pedagogue, and scholar based in Montreal. She was a founding member, programmer, project manager, and producer of the Chicago Contemporary Circus Festival and CirqueOFF. Dana recently completed her Master’s Degree at Concordia University under fellowship researching the circus body and its embodied knowledge. She will continue her research explorations and performance of the circus body and speculative performance narratives as a PhD student at Concordia, Fall 2018. Dana’s work reflects an agenda that advocates for socially conscious performances and alternative, queer, feminist, political narratives that cultivate agency on the circus stage.

Sarah Elkashef is a theatre artist, primarily a dramaturg, working in new play development and interdisciplinary creation. At Playwrights’ Workshop Montréal she leads the Interdisciplinary Writer’s Lab in addition to various other projects. At the National Theatre School of Canada she often works across programs as a dramaturg, creator, and teacher and in 2016 received their Bernard Amyot Award for Teaching. Sarah recently co-created a circus show for families Eat Sweet Feet, and continues to work on High Z, an immersive performance installation for planetariums based on the 2011 Nobel prize winning discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe. Prior to settling in Canada she was the Senior Reader at Soho Theatre in London, U.K. Sarah has also been an associate producer, company manager, literary associate and more in New York City. She is a graduate of Warwick University in English Literature and Theatre (U.K.), has an M.A. in Theatre from Hunter College (CUNY, NYC), and a Graduate Diploma in Communications from Concordia University (Montreal, Canada).

 

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Protective Practices for Playwrights

ExplorinPractice with Robin Sokoloski

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LIVESTREAM THIS TRAINING:

For the first time ever, we will be offering a livestream of an Exploring Practice session. Live viewers will have the opportunity to ask questions in real time. Two 60-90 minute portions of the workshop will be streamed live:

  1. Starting roughly at 11 am ET on November 19th, Robin will familiarize participants with the basics of intellectual property and copyright law.
  2. Starting roughly at 10:30 am ET on November 20th, Robin will present an overview of production contracts (in particular premiere contracts and stock contracts).
  3. If you are interested in remotely attending these sessions, please email harris@playwrights.ca for more information. Please note that this a test run and may not become a regular practice.

 

An introduction to copyright, artists’ rights

Dates: November 19-21, 2018
Time: 10AM to 3PM
Location: PWM
Fee: $45 (Fee is not a barrier to anyone who might be interested/eligible)
Application deadline: November 4, 2018

 

Protective Practices for Playwrights

Through a sequence of liberating structures, Robin Sokoloski, Executive Director of Playwrights Guild of Canada will guide participants through a three-day hands-on workshop that will focus on the rights and freedoms of playwrights  within a Canadian theatre context.

The workshop will begin with an in-depth look at the rights one should know and understand about artist’s intellectual property. Participants will then be thoroughly introduced to the standard set of professional contracts (negotiated and ratified in June 2017 by Playwrights Guild of Canada and the Professional Association of Canadian Theatres). Specific clauses such as participation rights, minimum guarantees, and commissioning will be examined. Contacts that specifically pertain to musicals, theatre for young audiences and the licensing of amateur rights will be layered on to what has been already learned. The end of the day will involve a peer-to-peer consulting activity to exercise what has been discussed throughout the day.

Day two will look at engaging other creators and Playwrights Guild of Canada’s set of guidelines for devised and collective creation, translation, adaptation, and digital rights.

During day three, participants will have the chance to further develop their negotiation skills. Robin will meet each participant individually and will talk them through the first phase of a contract negotiation.

Each participant will have access to a digital package of contracts and an optional one-on-one contract clinic after the workshop has taken place with Playwrights Guild of Canada at the time of their choosing.

Application guideline: To apply for this training, please submit a bio and CV, and a short (1-2 paragraph) statement explaining why this subject interests you or how it is relevant to your practice.
Please send applications to emma@playwrights.ca
Subject line: Exploring practice with Robin Sokoloski
Application deadline: November 4, 2018

 

ROBIN SOKOLOSKI has been the Executive Director of Playwrights Guild of Canada (PGC) since 2010.

As Executive Director, Ms. Sokoloski has taken part in the organization’s triennial contract negotiations, launched the Canadian Play Outlet (a book store dedicated entirely to Canadian Plays), fostered a growing national awards program for playwrights, the Tom Hendry Awards, and led major changes within the organization. Recently, she spearheaded a research initiative on digital rights for playwrights.

As a facilitator, Ms. Sokoloski utilizes liberating structures to convene and engage participants in animated conversations on a variety of topics pertaining to the arts sector.

Ms. Sokoloski remains committed to ensuring Canadian artists are treated fairly and are informed of their rights. She volunteers for various arts organization as a way of staying connected to the arts community and ensuring public access to artistic experiences. She currently Chairs Access Copyrights’ Membership Advisory Committee, sits on Ryerson University’s Centre For Free Expression Advisory Committee, and is a founding member of Mass Culture/Mobilisation Culturelle.

 

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Preparing Project Grants for Emerging Artists (emphasis on inclusivity and diversity)

Exploring Practice with Jesse Stong

Now accepting applications for our next training session with Jesse Stong

Dates: February 24 and 25, 2018
Time: 10AM to 5PM
Location: PWM
Fee: $45 (Fee is not a barrier to anyone who might be interested/eligible)

Using innovative, interactive activities Jesse Stong (Art Educator/Playwright) will support emerging artists to develop a strong application for their own future project grants. From seeding and exploring initial ideas to developing dynamic writing samples, and participating in group brainstorms to elaborate and articulate project outlines with realistic timelines and budgets. By the end of this hands-on sessions each participant will leave with their own completed first draft of a grant proposal, as well as many tips on finding a diversification of funding, independent fundraising strategies, and guidance on building partnerships for the future life of their proposed project.

Topics Covered

a) General Grant Writing Tips/Cautions 
b) Stress and Time Management/Infusing GRANT WRITING into your artistic practice
c) Hands-On Project Proposal Building (developing treatment, describing project)
d) Creative Activities (exploring innovative grant writing processes)
e) Expressing authentic NEED and attracting SUPPORT
f) Group Brainstorm Sessions (exploring ideas, developing proposals further in the workshop)
g) Editing and Increasing Impact (How to sharpen your grant)
h) Action planning/specific measurable steps towards grant submission
i) Ongoing Discussions/Group Sharing of Resources/Sources of Funding

Expectations

  • Participants should come to the workshop with a project/residency idea they are genuinely interested in developing a grant proposal for
    (the idea can be fully developed or a seed of a new project)
  • Participants should be expected to engage with the hands-on process.
  • Participants will support the ideas of others/contribute to the group discussions.
  • Participants will leave with a clear plan to continue to process forward

Application guideline: Send a cover letter describing your interest in the sessions, a biography and CV
Please send applications to emma@playwrights.ca
Subject line: Exploring Practice with Jesse Stong 
Application deadline extended: February 21, 2018

Instructor:

Jesse Stong is happy to be back for a third year designing and leading PWM’s Young Creators Unit. Jesse is a graduate of Playwriting from the National Theatre School of Canada and is completing his Masters in Art Education at Concordia University. Jesse was recently assistant curator for the National Art’s Centre Disability Summit, and in 2016 received the Michaëlle Jean Foundation award for his innovative writing/puppetry workshops for schools and youth groups. Jesse is a proud member of the board of directors at Les Muses: Centre for dance and performance training, for people living with intellectual differences, as well as a writing facilitator for the Quebec Writers Federation.

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The Arrivals Legacy Project

Exploring Practice Intensive with Diane Roberts

Now accepting applications for our next training session with Diane Roberts

Dates: January 25 to 29, 2018
Time: 10AM to 6PM
Location: PWM
Fee: $50.00 (Fee is not a barrier to anyone who might be interested/eligible)

The Arrivals Personal Legacy (APL) Exploring Practice Intensive is a creative process designed for those who wish to create new works based on Ancestry and personal history. The process allows participants to connect in new ways to their authentic historic bodies as a powerful source for artistic expression, personal & cultural empowerment. The APL method is a combination of “Afrisporic” influenced performance traditions (dance, voice, movement, alignment, balance), contemporary story weaving and improve techniques that opens doors for the emergence of embodied truths drawn for critically anchored personal places. For more information, visit www.arrivalslegacy.com.

Application guideline:

To apply for this training, please submit a short statement to dramaturg@playwrights.ca (.doc/.rtf/.pdf) containing:

  • why you want to participate
  • what life experience you bring
  • artistic discipline and training (if any)
  • your name, phone numbers, mailing address and email
  • a small .jpg photo of yourself

Application deadline: January 12, 2018 at 5 PM

Instructor:

Diane Roberts is an accomplished director, dramaturge, writer and cultural animator, who has collaborated with innovative theatre visionaries and interdisciplinary artists for the past 30 years. Her directorial and dramaturgical work has been seen on stages across Canada and her reputation as a mentor, teacher and community collaborator is nationally and internationally recognized. Roberts has birthed a vision for theatre that encourages Indigenous ways of knowing as a stepping stone to creative expression.

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Subverting the canon: Writing plays as though race, class, gender and sexual orientation mattered

Exploring Practice with Corrina Hodgson

Now accepting applications for our next training session with Corrina Hodgson.

Dates: December 11, 12, 18 and 19, 2017
Time: 4PM to 8PM
Location: PWM
Fee: $45 (Fee is not a barrier to anyone who might be interested/eligible)

“The well-made play holds a mirror to society and in so doing it mirrors the very forces that oppress those of us who are not straight, white, able-bodied, men.

As a disabled, fat, queer playwright, I am obsessed with exploring ways to break that mirror through breaking traditional three-act structure.

In this workshop we will look at a number of different scripts and scenes that are utilizing Epic Theatre techniques in a variety of ways to accomplish a subject position for marginalized voices. We will look at our own work, and see if these techniques can be applied, and how our characters benefit from these applications. As such, participants should come with a completed piece that they are willing to work on and share with other members. This can be a one-act or full-length piece.” – Corrina

Familiarity with recent Montreal productions such as Tragic Queens, The Mountaintop, Angelique, and Intractable Woman is beneficial but not essential.

Familiarity with the following texts would be appreciated, as we will probably be referring to them frequently throughout the workshop:

  • Venus, Suzan Lori Parks
  • Peeling, Katie O’Reilly
  • You for Me for You, Mia Chung

There is also a certain presumed familiarity with the works of Tony Kushner, Brad Fraser, Timberlake Wertenbaker, Caryl Churchill, Sarah Daniels, and Sarah Kane.

Application guideline: To apply for this training,  please submit a bio, a short (1-2 paragraph) statement of why this particular approach to playwriting is of interest to you, the piece that you intend to work on, and a couple of sentences about your familiarity with Epic Theatre.
Please send applications to emma@playwrights.ca
Subject line: Exploring Practice with Corrina Hodgson
Application deadline: December 1, 2017 at 5PM

Instructor:

Corrina Hodgson holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Her plays have been produced across Canada and in the US as well as on CBC Radio One. She is the past winner of the Jane Chambers International Playwriting Competition, Theatre BC’s Playwriting Competition, and has been Playwright in Residence at the University of Lethbridge, as well as on the Antechamber Writer’s Unit at Buddies in Bad Times and the Groundswell Writers Unit at Nightwood Theatre. She is one of the co-founders of the Rose Festival.

“The well-made play.
So very entertaining.
And so very dangerous.
So we can change the characters in our plays.
And we can change the orientation of those charactersAnd can “crip up” those characters.
And diversify the race and gender of those characters.
But unless and until we break the mirror, we will continue to reproduce the social forces that marginalize and deny a subject position to minority voices — even when we position them as protagonists in our dramas, reimagine the context of those dramas, or repopulate those dramas with the bodies and peoples we want to see onstage.” – Corrina

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